The social media star is preparing to launch a podcast named Impaulsive — "a play on my last name and my tendencies"

By Aurelie Corinthios
October 31, 2018 04:18 PM
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Emma McIntyre/Getty

Logan Paul wants another chance.

In a new interview with the Hollywood Reporter, the 23-year-old social media star opened up about the controversy that erupted earlier this year after he posted a YouTube vlog that showed the body of an alleged suicide victim in Japan — and his plans for what’s next.

“I had never had a crisis before, ever,” said Paul, who deleted the video, apologized and created a suicide prevention PSA. “Everything had been a smooth-sailing ride to the top.”

Recalling the frantic first hours of global outrage, Paul said his phone was blowing up with texts “from friends, family, colleagues, accomplices.”

“I’m like, wow, I really f—ed up, to a degree that this may be the only thing people remember me by, and that is my worst nightmare,” he said, admitting that for most of New Year’s Day, he “wobbled around [his] hotel room, not sure what the f— to do.”

The next day, he flew back to Los Angeles for an emergency meeting with a team of lawyers, publicists and agents that ended up lasting eight hours. Paul said he was stunned.

“I was so used to people liking me,” he said. “But being hated? I hate it. I hate being hated!”

RELATED VIDEO: YouTube Star Logan Paul Apologizes to Fans After Sharing Video from Japanese ‘Suicide Forest’

In the months that followed, though he resumed vlogging on YouTube, Paul has mostly maintained a low profile. Instead of starring in outrageous videos, Paul revealed to THR that his new plan is to taper off from the video-sharing site and focus on a podcast he’s preparing to launch in the near future, named Impaulsive — “a play on my last name and my tendencies.”

“If I’m going to do something, I might as well go for it,” he said, revealing that he had a broadcast studio installed in his home.

Asked for his take on whether he’d been “canceled” by the internet, Paul was quick to shoot the notion down.

“Good luck trying to cancel me,” he said. “It’s so easy for anyone to be like, ‘Logan Paul just ended his career, he’s done.’ But the only person who will ever decide whether that’s true is me. Like, if I sleep for the rest of my life, maybe. But, like, dog — I love this s—. This creating? It’s my passion.”

Paul has previously insisted he’s not going anywhere.

“I’m not going to try to ignore it, I can’t ignore it — so I’m not going to pretend like that didn’t happen,” he said in a February vlog, his first since the scandal.

“I know for a fact everything I do from this point on will get criticism, it will get backlash, because I’m a very polarizing dude,” he continued. “You either love me, or you hate me. … So internet, please, use me, bro. Crucify me, vilify me, and I can promise you one thing, guys — I’m not going anywhere.”