Tristan Thompson, who plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers, won't be able to compete for the remainder of the season due to coronavirus

By Natalie Stone
March 12, 2020 05:31 PM
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After the National Basketball Association made the announcement on Wednesday evening, the 28-year-old Cleveland Cavaliers player spoke out on Twitter.

“This is crazy,” he tweeted alongside three flushed face emojis.

Thompson’s response came shortly after the NBA announced its decision to suspend the remainder of the season after Utah Jazz player Rudy Gobert tested positive for coronavirus.

In a statement shared on Twitter, the NBA said, “The NBA announced that a player on the Utah Jazz has preliminary tested positive for COVID-19. The test was reported shortly prior to the tip-off of tonight’s game between the Jazz and Oklahoma City Thunder at Chesapeake Energy Arena.”

“The NBA is suspending game play following the conclusion of tonight’s schedule of games until further notice. The NBA will use this hiatus to determine next steps for moving forward in regard to the coronavirus pandemic,” the statement concluded.

Tristan Thompson

On Monday, Gobert appeared to poke fun at the virus during a press conference when he leaned over and touched all of the microphones and recorders following his interview.

“As part of the Jazz’s COVID-19 response, shoot around availability was done in the ZBBC media room today rather than on the court. As Rudy Gobert got finished discussing the situation, he stood up, leaned over and made it a point to touch every mic and recorder in front of him,” Utah Jazz reporter for the Salt Lake Tribune Eric Walden tweeted.

Prior to the NBA’s announcement, the Utah Jazz tweeted an injury report, revealing that players Gobert and Emmanuel Mudiay would not play in Wednesday night’s game against Oklahoma City Thunder due to “illness.”

Mudiay’s status was not clear as of Wednesday night.

Earlier Wednesday, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic.

When officials made the announcement, they urged world leaders and citizens to take action to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

“Pandemic is not a word to use lightly or carelessly,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director general, at a press conference in Geneva. “It is a word that, if misused, can cause unreasonable fear, or unjustified acceptance that the fight is over, leading to unnecessary suffering and death.”

“There’s been so much attention on one word,” he said. “Let me give you some other words that matter much more, and that are much more actionable: Prevention. Preparedness. Public health. Political leadership. And most of all, people.

According to its official website, WHO defines a pandemic as “the worldwide spread of a new disease.” (Get even more information about pandemics, what defines them and why the coronavirus is one here.)

“Describing the situation as a pandemic does not change WHO’s assessment of the threat posed by this coronavirus,” said Ghebreyesus. “It doesn’t change what WHO is doing, and it doesn’t change what countries should do.”

He added: “We’re in this together, to do the right things with calm and protect the citizens of the world. It’s doable.”

Tristan Thompson
Abbie Parr/Getty

Despite the global outbreak — which has resulted in the cancellation of professional and collegiate sporting events, festivals, concerts tours, and much more — Thompson still has reason to celebrate.

On Friday, the professional athlete, who shares 23-month-old daughter True with Kardashian, will turn 29.