Brandon Hickman/NBC
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January 29, 2015 06:20 PM

It all comes down to this.

After months on the Biggest Loser ranch, the three Biggest Loser: Glory Days finalists were sent home to see who could return for the live finale Thursday with enough weight lost to take home the title of The Biggest Loser.

The competition is always steep on the NBC reality weight-loss show, but on a season where every contestant was a former athlete, no one was making it to the finals without putting up a major fight.

In contention for the title are three very different contestants who all hope they have done what it takes to win the $250,000 prize:

Toma Dobrosavljevic, 33, was born in South Chicago to Serbian immigrant parents and raised in nearby Addison, Illinois. An active soccer player through his college years, Dobrosavljevic’s life changed nine years ago when his father died at the age of 54.

The senior project manager says he moved home to care for his mother and began to gain weight. After ballooning to 336 lbs., Dobrosavljevic says his wake-up call came when his life insurance agent told him he was almost uninsurable because of his weight.

“I saw my father fight for his life and his last breath. I feel like I’ve let him down” Dobrosavljevic said on the show.

But by the time he left the ranch to complete his transformation at home, he had already dropped to 199 lbs.

Sonya Jones, 39, is a former semi-pro softball player who was All-American two consecutive years and was once named the All-American Player of the Year. But the physical education teacher from Springfield, Illinois, says her lack of self-control and genetic predisposition for weight gain led to her tipping the scales at 283 lbs. before becoming a contestant on The Biggest Loser.

“I honestly can’t imagine someone else finding me attractive when I am 100 percent embarrassed to be at this weight,” Jones said on the show before becoming a front-runner early on in the season and eventually leaving the ranch at 163 lbs.

Rob Guiry, 26, says he always struggled with his weight, but being involved in sports – particularly as a rugby player at Western New England University – helped him keep his size in check. Now, the rugby coach from Springfield, Massachusetts, says he felt his 483 lbs. were holding him back.

“I am definitely motivated to make that change and turn things around and be the person the athlete and the man I’ve always wanted to be,” Guiry said on the show.

And though he often struggled and was prone for angry outbursts during his time on the ranch, he was still able to make it to the finals and head home at just 302 lbs.

But anything could have happened during the finalists’ time at home.

Who did what was necessary to be declared the Biggest Loser? And who of the other 17 contestants will take home the $100,000 at-home prize?

Those questions will be answered on the live Biggest Loser finale Thursday at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

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