"We've had a lot of somber talks about it and deep conversations," Terry Crews said of today's social justice issues

By Robyn Merrett
June 24, 2020 04:50 PM
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Terry Crews in Brooklyn Nine-Nine
ordin Althaus/NBC via Getty

Terry Crews said Brooklyn Nine-Nine scrapped several new episodes of the NBC cop comedy in the wake of George Floyd's death and the protests against police brutality that followed.

Crews, 51, who stars as Lieutenant Terry Jeffords on the show, told Access Daily that the cast and crew members of the show have been having frank conversations about racism and how the current events will impact the series.

"We've had a lot of somber talks about it and deep conversations and we hope through this we're going to make something that will be truly groundbreaking this year," Crews said. "We have an opportunity and we plan to use it in the best way possible."

"Our showrunner Dan Goor, they had four episodes all ready to go and they just threw them in the trash. We have to start over," he continued, adding," This is an opportunity right now for us all to united and get together and understand what this is and that we have to battle this together."

Crews did not elaborate on the content of the episodes. NBC did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment.

The stars of Brooklyn Nine-Nine and showrunner Goor have been supportive of the Black Lives Matter movement. Earlier this month, Goor tweeted that he and the cast made a $100,000 donation to the National Bail Bund Network, which aims to provide bail and bond funds across the country.

"The cast and showrunner of Brooklyn 99 condemn the murder of George Floyd and support the many people who are protesting police brutality nationally. Together we have made a $100,000 donation to The National Bail Fund Network," he tweeted. "We encourage you to look up your local bail fund: the National Bail Fund Network is an organization that can lead you to them. #BlackLivesMatter."

Andy Samberg and Terry Crews on Brooklyn Nine-Nine
John P. Fleenor/NBCUniversal via Getty

During his interview with Access Daily, Crews also opened up about his own experiences as a Black man in America.

"You've seen me, in movies or whatever but before all this, I was always a threat. I would be going to the mall or going different places. I've had guns pointed at me by police officers in L.A.," he said. "This was before I was famous. The thing is, they had the wrong guy."

"It's something that every Black man has been through and it's hard to really try to get other people to understand," he continued. "I have to say, right here, what is going on right now is Black America's Me Too movement. We always knew this was happening, but now white people are understanding."

To help combat systemic racism, consider learning from or donating to these organizations:

  • Campaign Zero (joincampaignzero.org) which works to end police brutality in America through research-proven strategies.
  • ColorofChange.org works to make government more responsive to racial disparities.
  • National Cares Mentoring Movement (caresmentoring.org) provides social and academic support to help Black youth succeed in college and beyond.