Ted Danson also opened up about the cast sleepover he threw at his house

By Jodi Guglielmi
January 31, 2020 10:51 AM
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It wasn’t easy for Ted Danson to say goodbye to The Good Place.

Danson, 72, opened up about the emotional series finale of the hit NBC sitcom, revealing that the entire cast got together to watch the last episode together.

“We had a wonderful goodbye,” he said Friday on the Today show. “It was really lovely because we had the whole year to say goodbye. We knew it was ending.”

In the series finale, Michael (Danson) and the crew restructure The Good Place, allowing people to leave the afterlife once and for all whenever they feel ready. One by one, each character fulfills their destiny before making their grand departure.

“It was perfect. It was an absolutely perfect goodbye,” Danson said. “It’s how you hope the universe works, really.”

The cast, including Danson, Kristen Bell, Jameela Jamil, William Jackson Harper, Manny Jacinto and D’Arcy Cardenl formed a tightknit friendship throughout the show’s four seasons — a bond that was fortified with a sleepover at Danson’s house a few weeks before the finale.

“Mary had everyone come over and we had a sleepover,” he said of his wife, actress Mary Steenburgen. “It makes a party even better when you can wake up, have a coffee and reminisce.”

So how is Danson feeling now that it’s all over?

“Not feeling very legendary,” he joked, admitting he was a bit hungover. “I tend to handle transitions by doing something a little too much. My kids took me to Stonewall. We missed the cabaret, but we played pool into the wee hours.”

Jackson Harper recently opened up to PEOPLE about his final days on set, saying it was “tough to leave” when they wrapped up shooting.

Credit: NBC

“There was a lot of weird crying,” he said. “For most of us, this is our most high-profile job, our most consistent job of our careers. To land on a show with such good people, and with such kind people, and such talented people, such smart people — it’s hard to say goodbye to that just because not every job is that.”

Creator Michael Schur announced the series’ final season on Twitter in June. He said he and the writing staff had previously decided four seasons “was the right lifespan.”

“At times over the past few years we’ve been tempted to go beyond four seasons, but mostly because making this show is a rare, creatively fulfilling joy, and at the end of the day, we don’t want to tread water just because the water is so warm and pleasant,” he wrote.