The couple, married since June 2012, announced earlier this month that they're expecting their fifth child together

By Dana Rose Falcone
April 17, 2020 10:00 AM
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Credit: Sylvain Gaboury/Getty Images

Hilaria Baldwin admits that taking care of four kids — and teaching three of them — while pregnant in quarantine amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic can be “challenging.”

“It’s really tough,” the Mom Brain podcast co-host, 36, tells PEOPLE in this week’s issue. “I have three different curriculums that I’m teaching my three older kids and I’m finding it to be hard.”

Hilaria — who announced earlier this month that she and her actor husband Alec are expecting their fifth child together — attempts to manage it all by creating systems.

“I want to prepare the night before and then have it all set up for them,” she says. “You’re getting curriculum from other people, so you’re trying to teach something that somebody else is telling you to teach. I’m trying to understand that and that I found to be challenging. But we’re figuring it out.”

It helps Hilaria to have the 30 Rock star, 62, around 24/7 while they stay home with kids Carmen, 6, Rafael, 4, Leonardo, 3, and Romeo, 2 next month, in the Hamptons. (Alec is also dad to daughter Ireland, 24.)

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“My husband has started cooking and it’s been really nice,” the yoga instructor says.

While Hilaria confesses that she and Alec have definitely had our moments” while self-isolating, the couple, married since June 2012, has been harmonious overall. “I’ve heard some intense conversations from people that are like, ‘Oh my God, I’m going to kill my person right now, it’s too much!’ ” author of The Living Clearly Method says. “We typically spend so much time together that this is really not abnormal.”

Alec and Hilaria Baldwin with their four kids and pets
| Credit: Hilaria Baldwin/Instagram
  • For more from Hilaria Baldwin, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands now

What she does find abnormal, though, is the family’s new daily rhythm.

“You can’t go get a cup of coffee or go out to dinner or go to the museum with the kids or bring them to school. All these things that I never would have thought so much were freedoms,” Hilaria says. “Now it’s like, ‘Oh my gosh, we had so much freedom before.’ And I never used that word for it. But I will definitely be using that word when we’re out of this.”