"You can call my mom too skinny or me too skinny but if we called you too big???? Hunny it’s the same thing," Amelia Gray Hamlin wrote

By Jodi Guglielmi
August 14, 2020 01:09 PM
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Lisa Rinna's daughter Amelia Gray Hamlin doesn't need anyone to tell her how to feel about her body.

Amelia clapped back at her mom's Real Housewives of Beverly Hills costar Garcelle Beauvais on Thursday after the actress questioned whether Rinna's dancing videos had a negative effect on the teenager's body image.

On Instagram, Rinna posted a video of Amelia dancing enthusiastically while banging a tambourine, writing, "I’d say she’s #Thriving."

Addressing Beauvais's comments, Amelia, 19, commented that "body-shaming is real."

"My question is why would your dancing videos make me 'feel bad'???? Who was she trying to body shame?? Am I fat? Why would that make me sad????? Body shaming is real. And not okay," she wrote. "You can call my mom too skinny or me too skinny but if we called you too big???? Hunny it’s the same thing."

Amelia Gray; Garcelle Beauvais
Matt Baron/Shutterstock; Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

During an episode of RHOBH earlier this season, Beauvais criticized Rinna's famous dancing videos in light of Amelia's eating disorder.

"I love that Lisa’s free enough to do the videos and be dancing, but the dancing nearly naked is not a choice for me if I had a daughter that had body issues,” she said in a confessional.

Then, on Wednesday's episode, Beauvais asked Rinna directly about Amelia's battle with anorexia.

"We took a dance class and we sat on the floor afterward, just talking about our kids, and I asked you, 'Do you think that your body image affected your daughter in any way?' " she recalled. "I don’t even have a daughter [but] dancing on Instagram in a bathing suit or underwear?"

"I actually don’t think that is what caused Amelia’s anorexia," Rinna shot back. "People are going to judge all of us as mothers."

Amelia first opened up about her issues in 2018. On an episode of RHOBH last year, she admitted to her mother that things got so bad, she “could have died.”

Amelia said she decided to speak out about her own struggle in the hopes that it will inspire others to seek help and go into recovery.

"I am SO beyond humbled and grateful to have the platform that I do at such a young age,” Amelia said in a 2018 Instagram post. “And to wake up every morning with a little girl reaching out to me and telling me I am her inspiration, really makes me feel like I have a purpose. I went through this journey not for attention, not for people to pitty [sic] me, but to help. I am on this earth to help people, and I know that.”

If you or someone you know is battling an eating disorder, please contact the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) at 1-800-931-2237 or go to NationalEatingDisorders.org.