Brad Garrett tweeted Thursday night that he knows "more than one who were treated horribly by" Ellen DeGeneres

By Ashley Boucher
July 31, 2020 08:13 PM
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Leah Thompson is agreeing with Brad Garrett's assessment of the allegedly toxic work environment on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

The Back to the Future actress, 59, responded on Twitter Friday to PEOPLE's report of Garrett's comments on the daytime talk show's culture.

"Sorry but it comes from the top ⁦@TheEllenShow," the Everybody Loves Raymond star, who appeared as a guest on the show six times between 2004 and 2007, wrote on Twitter, tagging Ellen DeGeneres. "Know more than one who were treated horribly by her.⁩ Common knowledge."

Thompson agreed that DeGeneres' alleged mistreatment is "common knowledge," writing on Twitter, "True story. It is."

Leah Thompson, Ellen DeGeneres, Brad Garrett
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After former employees described the show's workplace environment as "toxic," WarnerMedia launched an internal investigation into the allegations.

DeGeneres shared a lengthy apology with staffers on Thursday, saying that she is "disappointed" that the workplace was not the "place of happiness" she sought to create when the show launched. She also added that she is "glad the issues" were brought to her attention, and she is promising to do her "part" in pushing herself and others "to learn and grow."

"I am so proud of the work we do and the fun and joy we all help put out in the world. I want everyone at home to love our show and I want everyone who makes it to love working on it," she wrote. "Again, I’m so sorry to anyone who didn’t have that experience. If not for COVID, I’d have done this in person, and I can’t wait to be back on our stage and see you all then. Stay safe and healthy. Love, Ellen."

WarnerBros. said in a statement Thursday that dozens of former and current employees had been interviewed about the show's work environment, and that the network was "disappointed that the primary findings of the investigation indicated some deficiencies related to the show’s day-to-day management."

The network said that "several staffing changes" were identified in addition to "appropriate measures" that will be made to "address the issues that have been raised."

Ellen DeGeneres
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Executive producers Ed Glavin, Mary Connelly and Andy Lassner took responsibility for the show's daily operations in a statement earlier this month, and promised to "do better."

"Over the course of nearly two decades, 3,000 episodes and employing over 1000 staff members, we have strived to create an open, safe and inclusive work environment," the producers said in a joint statement to BuzzFeed News on July 16. "We are truly heartbroken and sorry to learn that even one person in our production family has had a negative experience."

"It’s not who we are and not who we strive to be, and not the mission Ellen has set for us," their statement continued. "For the record, the day-to-day responsibility of the Ellen show is completely on us. We take all of this very seriously and we realize, as many in the world are learning, that we need to do better, are committed to do better, and we will do better."

Former employees of the show have anonymously alleged sexual misconduct and harassment involving top producers at the show, according to a report published Thursday by BuzzFeed News.

The former employees, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, leveled allegations about the culture behind the scenes of the show, including against head writer Kevin Leman and executive producer Glavin.

Leman and another producer have denied the allegations against them in separate statements. Glavin has not yet publicly addressed the allegations.

A spokesperson for WarnerMedia declined to comment on the report. A rep for Ellen DeGeneres did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment.