The Weeds actor discusses his new show Good Girls Revolt and how audiences can keep the show in production

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Credit: Jessica Miglio/ Sony Pictures Television/Amazon

Hunter Parrish‘s on-screen fate is in your hands.

PEOPLE recently caught up with the newly married star to discuss how viewers can help his new Amazon pilot Good Girls Revolt get picked up for a full season. And, full disclosure: The conversation might have involved him talking about taking off his shirt.

Based on Lynn Povich’s 2012 novel, Good Girls Revolt tells the story of a group of women at Newsweek in the late ’60s who fought for their rights in the workplace. Parrish plays Douglas Rhodes, a young man who, like the majority of men at that time, is slow to embrace the idea of women taking on traditionally male jobs.

“Doug is in a place that’s identifiable for a lot of people,” says Parrish, 28. “As the world changes and we have to make the choice of whether to be a part of something that is spectacular and correct and on the right side of something and learn how to tweak the traditions that we’re used to.”

Speaking of traditions fit for tweaking, Parrish admits that, while he enjoys being able to play more adult characters in more adult scenarios (yes, that includes sex scenes), he’d like to limit his amount of, ahem, “exposure” moving forward.

“We were filming a [sex] scene that didn’t make the pilot,” Parrish recalls. “I think I showed my butt and afterward, Dana [Calvo, the show’s creator,] was like, ‘How do you feel about these types of things?’ And I said to her, on a personal level, ‘Yeah you know, I’m kind of more into protecting my body now.’ And it was such an interesting conversation to have, especially in light of what we’re talking about with women being objectified for their entire career. Those sorts of fun, interesting conversations that being able to be birthed out of shows like this and conversations we’re having in Hollywood.”

Parrish went on to predict an eventual end to his on-screen shirtlessness. “Every script that I read whether it’s film, a TV show or whatever, the guy inadvertently has to take his shirt off,” he says. “But I feel that door closing fairly soon [for me]. I’ve done it enough.”

Lest his fans get too depressed, he adds with a laugh: “There’s plenty of pictures of me online with my shirt off.”

Parrish says the show has a much greater message, though, because Good Girls is, at its core, about issues to which everyone can relate.

“If you’re interested in the freedom and liberation of women and how that’s come about and how that relates to what we’re going through today – women still fighting for that in the workplace – and you’re interested in the era, which is an incredible time in our culture and history, then this time period in the show is relatable to people across the board,” he says. “It’s not something only women can identify with.”

Parrish emphasizes that the series can only get a full season pick-up if viewers watch the pilot on Amazon and fill out a ratings survey, essentially voting up Good Girls over several other competing series.

“The greatest thing to do is go and watch,” says Parrish. “You have to watch the entire show and then give us a rating – which will be five stars, of course.”

Voting ends today for Good Girls Revolt, which also starring newcomer Genevieve Angelson, Grace Gummer of American Horror Story and Pitch Perfect‘s Anna Camp.