Starting on Friday, HBO is making several of its original series available to stream for free amid the coronavirus pandemic

By Maria Pasquini
April 02, 2020 05:57 PM
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Credit: Will Hart/HBO

HBO is doing its part to keep people entertained amid the coronavirus pandemic.

On Thursday, the television network announced that for a limited time it would be making almost 500 hours of television shows, movies and documentaries available for free — and without a subscription.

Starting Friday, HBO will make nine of its award-winning original series available for people to stream in entirety on HBO NOW and HBO GO. Although the list does not include their massive hit Westworld, which is currently airing, it does feature some of their most popular programs of all time.

Older series like The Sopranos, Six Feet Under, The Wire and True Blood will be accessible for free, as will newer shows Ballers, Barry, Silicon Valley, Succession, and Veep.

At-home viewers will also be able to access a list of Warner Bros movies, including family films Pokémon Detective Pikachu and The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, as well as feel-good films Isn’t it Romantic? and Crazy, Stupid, Love.

Additionally, HBO will be making 10 of its original documentaries and docuseries available, including McMillion$ and The Case Against Adnan Syed.

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Of course, HBO isn’t the only network to give people who are practicing social distancing at home something new and exciting to watch.

Hallmark Channel is offering new users a free 30-day trial to its SVOD platform, Hallmark Movies Now, which features hundreds of hours of Hallmark series and movies.

A number of recently-released films are also arriving early to stream for audiences to watch at home, including Birds of Prey, Trolls World Tour and Frozen 2.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments. To help provide doctors and nurses on the front lines with life-saving medical resources, donate to Direct Relief here.