"Women can be scientists AND look good in a skirt," Zee responded to an anonymous Twitter user

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Ginger Zee
Credit: Roy Rochlin/WireImage

Ginger Zee isn't letting anyone undermine her intelligence.

On Friday, the chief meteorologist for ABC News shut down an anonymous Twitter user after they responded to her tweet reading "I am human. Just a friendly reminder," by belittling her as merely someone who is "paid millions to read cue cards."

"Can you please get me paid millions and no, I don't read anything — I ad lib," Zee wrote back. "I'm a scientist who talks about science — with no script."

The Twitter user then responded to her again, writing: "you're a weather girl who looks good in a skirt."

Zee also decided to clap back, telling the user she chose to reply again "in case others need the education."

"Women can be scientists AND look good in a skirt," she wrote. "I happen to be one of those women. Don't project your anger and frustration on others without knowing the facts."

The exchange ended there, but Zee did reply to one more follower, who said: "The insecurities of others will always try to dictate who you are when they in all actuality don't like themselves. Continue to surround yourself with those who celebrate you and not tolerate you."

"This is always great advice," the meteorologist added, retweeting the message.

Zee has previously been open about the pride she takes in her career and the battles she fought to get there. Last year, she opened up about her struggles with mental health during her early career in honor of Suicide Prevention Week.

Sharing a throwback photo, she wrote: "This photo always breaks my heart. This was during my first real job on tv at WEYI. This wide, forced smile was not long after my second suicide attempt. Of course no one at work knew. I was a master at hiding my mental health issues. Especially from myself."

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The ABC News star continued, "It is #suicidepreventionweek and I often wonder if there is anything I could go back and say to myself the morning I tried to take my own life. I don't know if I would have been ready to hear it - I don't know if this message will help — but I feel it is my duty to talk about it — because I was lucky. Beyond the luck, I had the support and financial ability to get the help I needed to treat my mental health issues. Not everyone has that."

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Zee went on to urge others to reach out for help and provided some resources.

"If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, take it seriously," she added. "Act immediately. Don't be afraid to go to the hospital to get urgent help and they can get you to the right type of therapy or medication you may need. For parents and young folks — @childmindinstitute has some great info and support."

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text "STRENGTH" to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.