From skateboarding through L.A. to shaving with Joe Namath, looking back on our favorite Farrah Fawcett moments, 12 years after the star's death
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It’s been 12 years since Farrah Fawcett died of cancer at the age of 62, but the actress’s memory remains with us. Fawcett’s famous blonde curls and Texas tan made her a ’70s icon, but her glamour was truly timeless.

“I celebrate the life of my beautiful, quirky, funny, brilliant friend Farrah today as I do every day,” costar Kate Jackson told PEOPLE in an exclusive statement five years after Fawcett's death. "Her memory is always with me, I carry her in my heart.”

Join us in remembering Fawcett’s legacy through five of our favorite clips from her decades-long career.

The Dating Game, 1969

One of Farrah’s first TV appearances saw the former beauty queen take part in this late-’60s dating show. Interestingly enough, the man she would choose had a striking resemblance to her future partner, Ryan O’Neal.

Noxema Commercial, 1973

By the early ’70s, Farrah had won small roles in projects as varied as The Partridge Family and Myra Breckinridge, but she still took regular gigs as a commercial pitch woman, including this famous Super Bowl spot with Joe Namath.

Charlie’s Angels, 1976

Fawcett’s role as Jill Munroe in Charlie’s Angels was so iconic that it’s easy to forget the actress only appeared in a season and change of the series – just 29 episodes in all. But watch the clips on YouTube and it’s clear why the show made her a star. We’re particular fans of this action sequence, where Munroe evades capture with only the help of a skateboard (and stunt double).

Late Show with David Letterman, 1997

Letterman made polite chit-chat with a notably loopy Fawcett during an appearance to promote her pay-per-view special, All of Me. The spot was so infamous that Fawcett spent nearly the entirety of her 1999 visit to Letterman’s couch rehashing it.

The Emmys, 2006

In her last public appearance, Farrah reunited with Angels costars Jackson and Jaclyn Smith to pay tribute to the show’s producer Aaron Spelling, who had died a few months before. Three years later, Fawcett received her own posthumous Emmy honor when she was nominated for producing the documentary Farrah’s Story.