The purge comes as Disney prepares to launch its own streaming service

By Jodi Guglielmi
May 23, 2019 01:54 PM
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Netflix subscribers, say goodbye to your favorite Disney movie classics.

The streaming service announced a slew of Disney movies are leaving in June to make way for a new lineup of films for the summer and fall season.

June 1 will see the end of 101 Dalmatians, The Jungle Book: Mowgli’s Story, An Extremely Goofy Movie and The Fox and the Hound 2.

Less than a week later, on June 5, fans will say farewell to Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Finally, on June 24, Mulan 2 will be removed from Netflix as well.

The purge comes as Disney prepares to launch its own streaming service, Disney+, where fans will once again be able to watch their favorite films at the touch of a button.

In November, the highly-successful animated film Moana left Netflix.

Fans should also expect even more movies owned by the Walt Disney Company to be taken off of Netflix’s service over the coming year.

Credit: Clive Coote/Disney/Shutterstock

Last month, there were also reports that The Office could be removed as early as 2021 due to NBCUniversal launching its own streaming service.

According to a new report from the Wall Street Journal, NBCUniversal executives are debating if pulling the show and passing on the licensing revenue is best. For exclusive streaming rights to The Office, Netflix reportedly paid around $100 million over the course of several years.

Friends could also be leaving Netflix if WarnerMedia, which is also launching a streaming service, decides to take it back, according to WSJ. In early December, after fans of the sitcom collectively lost it when they noticed an expiration date of Jan. 1, 2019 on the show’s landing page, Netflix confirmed that the beloved NBC sitcom would remain available in the U.S. throughout 2019.

The company reportedly paid around $100 million to continue licensing Friends from WarnerMedia. Netflix, which acquired all 236 episodes on Jan. 1, 2015, had previously paid $30 million a year to stream the show.