Stephanie Beatriz donated $11,000 to the National Bail Fund Network as protestors take to city streets and protest police brutality after the killing of George Floyd

By Jodi Guglielmi
June 02, 2020 05:24 PM
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Stephanie Beatriz is calling on actors who play cops to donate to the National Bail Fund Network as people across the United States continue to take to city streets and protest police brutality after the killing of George Floyd.

The Brooklyn Nine-Nine actress, who stars as Detective Rosa Diaz on the hit sitcom, donated $11,000 to the network on Tuesday.

She shared a screenshot of her donation receipt on Twitter, urging other actors who play police officers to do the same.

"I’m an actor who plays a detective on tv," she wrote. "If you currently play a cop? If you make tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in residuals from playing a cop? I’ll let you do the math. (Thanks @GriffLightning for leading the way)."

Stephanie Beatriz
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty

A screenshot of her contribution receipt reads: "Thank you for making a contribution to the #FreeThemAll Emergency Response Fund. Your donation will be distributed to a local bail/bond fund in the National Bail Fund Network to get someone free from jail or immigration detention during the COVID-19 crisis."

Beatriz, 39, said she was inspired after Griffin Newman made the same donation.

"I’m an out-of-work actor who (improbably) played a detective on two episodes of BLUE BLOODS almost a decade ago," Newman wrote on Twitter. "If you currently play a cop? If you make tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars a year in residuals from playing a cop? I’ll let you do the math."

On Wednesday, Brooklyn Nine-Nine showrunner Dan Goor announced he and the cast had donated $100,000 to the National Bail Fund Network.

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The National Bail Fund is a non-profit organization that aims to mitigate incarceration rates through bail reform.

Over the weekend, protests against police brutality and systemic racism unfolded across the country. Some of them have turned destructive and violent, and hundreds have been arrested as they protest.

The demonstrations began last week in Minneapolis when footage of Floyd — an unarmed black man who died after a white police officer pinned him to the ground with a knee on his neck — began circulating online.

The Minneapolis police officer in the video — identified as Derek Chauvin — has been fired and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

There have been protests in at least 30 other U.S. cities, including Los Angeles, San Jose, Denver, New York City, Chicago and Washington D.C. Americans have continued to storm their cities in dissent of racial inequality and police brutality.

To help combat systemic racism, consider learning from or donating to these organizations:

•Campaign Zero (joincampaignzero.org) which works to end police brutality in America through research-proven strategies.

ColorofChange.org works to make government more responsive to racial disparities.

•National Cares Mentoring Movement (caresmentoring.org) provides social and academic support to help black youth succeed in college and beyond.