Abby Lee Miller underwent a five-hour surgery on April 17 that required an 18-inch incision on her back

By Karen Mizoguchi
April 27, 2018 06:26 PM
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Abby Lee Miller shared the first photo of her injured back after undergoing emergency surgery ten days ago.

“This gives a whole new meaning to being stabbed in the back!” the former Dance Moms star, 51, captioned a photo of at least 18 surgical staples in her back with her nurse giving a thumbs up with her left hand.

Miller underwent a five-hour multi-level laminectomy on April 17 that required an 18-inch incision on her back.

Dr. Hooman M. Melamed — an orthopedic spine surgeon at Cedar Sinai Marina Del Rey Hospital who has been treating Miller — told PEOPLE through a rep that he had to remove the back part of several vertebrae to back to relieve pressure her spinal cord.

In addition, he also revealed that though Miller’s health is “looking good” and she has a lot more movement in her arms legs and toes, which is a” very good sign,” she’s “not out of the woods yet” and will need another spinal surgery.

“If we didn’t do something, she was going to die,” Dr. Melamed previously told PEOPLE of the long surgery. “Her blood pressure was bottoming out. She was not doing well.”

Doctors originally thought the reality star was suffering from a spinal infection. But on April 18, Melamed preliminarily diagnosed Miller with Burkitt lymphoma — a form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma which is cancer that develops in the lymphatic system.

On April 21, Miller broke her silence about her health when she shared a selfie from the hospital.

The emergency surgery came three weeks after she entered a halfway house following her prison release. When she is released from the hospital, Miller will have to go back to the halfway house, a source previously told PEOPLE.

Two weeks after she left jail, Miller was hospitalized for a thyroid condition. She was taken to an emergency room in Los Angeles, according to TMZ, which first reported the news.

In May 2017, Miller received a sentence of one year and one day in federal prison, followed by two years of supervised release for bankruptcy fraud. She was additionally fined $40,000 and ordered to pay the $120,000 judgment, as well as give a DNA sample relating to her felony charge.