Located in Boise, Idaho, the supersize spud was originally created for the Idaho Potato Commission to promote the vegetable

By Helen Murphy
April 24, 2019 02:33 PM
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The perfect place to kick back, relax and be a couch potato for a night? Inside a giant tuber of course!

A recent Airbnb listing for a “potato hotel” in Boise, Idaho, is going viral — and it can be yours to rent for $200 per night.

According to the Idaho Statesman, the six-ton potato structure was originally created for the Idaho Potato Commission to be driven around the country promoting potatoes.

After six years on the road, the Potato Commission didn’t know what to do with the giant spud until tiny house developer Kristie Wolfe stepped in.

Wolfe wanted to make the potato into an Airbnb, so she redid the hollow inside of the potato, adding a wood floor and chic bohemian decor including a queen-sized bed and two easy chairs. (And, yes, there is a bathroom!)

“It was always in my game plan,” Wolfe told the newspaper. “I had the perfect lot, and some day I was going to get that potato and turn it into something cool.”

Guests will be able to stay at the potato hotel starting at the end of May. According to the Airbnb listing, the nights in May are already sold out, but there are still dates available in June.

Among the amenities listed on Airbnb are air conditioning, an indoor fireplace and hot water.

“Stay in a 6 ton potato!,” the listing reads. “This is the original potato that traveled countless miles across the country for the Idaho Potato Commission on the back of a semi truck!”

In a fitting touch, Wolfe even planted sweet potatoes around the structure, which is located in between the Union Pacific Railroad’s Southern Idaho route and an Air National Guard training center.

“It’s very American,” she told the Statesman. “You’ve got potatoes and the military and the railroad. It’s a good way to experience Idaho in a night or two.”