The Fantasy Castle, which took over 500 hours to build, features over 30,000 individual pieces and is decorated in 24-carat gold

By Eric Todisco
July 28, 2020 05:53 PM
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Visual China Group via Getty

A visit to a dreamy Disney castle recently turned into a nightmare scenario for two young kids at the Museum of Glass in Shanghai.

The two youngsters were chasing each other around one of the exhibits when they hit into a $64,000 glass replica of a Disney castle, a museum spokesperson revealed in a statement on the Chinese social media site Weibo back in May.

The tower, also known as The Fantasy Castle, was “demolished,” the spokesperson said, while other parts were damaged.

According to Vice, The Fantasy Castle is valued at 450,000 yuan ($64,000) and took 500 hours to build. It was created by the Arribas Brothers, Spanish artisans who gave the castle to the museum in 2016. The glass display features over 30,000 individual pieces and is decorated in 24-carat gold. It weighs about 60 kilograms (132 pounds).

Despite its name, the castle appears to be inspired by the one at the center of Shanghai Disneyland that is officially known as the Enchanted Storybook Castle.

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The museum seemed to take the incident in stride, commenting on Weibo, “The little visitors knew that their behavior was inappropriate, and, under the encouragement of their parents, reported the incident to the museum staff. Their attitudes were friendly and sincere, and they agreed to help out with follow-up matters.”

Despite damage to the castle, Rudy Arribas, president of Arribas Brothers, said his brother Miguel is not upset about the incident.

"Luckily it’s not destroyed. As soon as the coronavirus travel restrictions are lifted, Miguel will go to Shanghai and do the repair. He loves to travel,” Rudy told Today Parents. “Miguel just is glad people are looking at his beautiful work.

Rudy explained that due to Arribas Brothers having stores at Disney parks and resorts around the world, they are all too familiar with accidents like this occurring.

“We're used to kids and this kind of stuff happening,” he explained. “Glass breaks. Nothing is done on purpose.”

The Fantasy Castle has required repairs once before, the first time due to vibrations caused by local trains going back and forth, Rudy said.