A tweet that showed off the security question elicited several comedic responses

By Ashley Boucher
November 20, 2019 12:20 AM
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Most parents would shy away from declaring one child their favorite — but that’s exactly what one tweet is inviting people to do.

A Twitter user shared a screenshot from JetBlue’s website on Sunday that showed a screen for setting up security questions to protect users’ accounts. The question selected in the screenshot seemed to be, “What is the name of your favorite child?”

“JetBlue savage for this,” the user wrote alongside the photo.

A JetBlue spokesperson tells PEOPLE that the real question from the dropdown menu is actually, “What is the name of your favorite childhood friend?” but that the question must have gotten cut off when the user clicked on it. The spokesperson explained that the customer would have had to have already seen the full question before selecting it.

On Tuesday, JetBlue’s Twitter account retweeted the photo, boldly stating: “Say it. You know you have one.”

The tweet quickly racked up more than a thousand likes, and garnered a plethora of comedic responses.

One user of the social media platform shared a GIF of “baby Yoda” from the new Disney+ series The Mandalorian, writing, “If I didn’t have a child this would be my answer all day long.”

The JetBlue account responded in Yoda-like fashion, commenting, “Hard to argue with, this choice is.”

Many users found the tweet hilarious, and still others could relate to the sentiment. As one user wrote, “I’m showing this to my dad. My name is incorporated in all of his passwords.”

While JetBlue’s tweet was written jokingly — the question itself could be considered a good one for security reasons.

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According to the Good Security Questions website, poor questions cause the user to either forget their answer, or can be easily guessed by other people. Theoretically, it’d be pretty difficult to forget your child’s name — and we can bet that if parents do have a favorite offspring, that’s not information they’d make many other people privy to.

The website says that signs of a good security question include the answer staying the same over long periods of time, simplicity, and a multitude of possible answers.