"Yesterday was a very hard day," Kloots said on her Instagram stories

By Tim McGovern
April 30, 2020 04:33 PM
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Nick Cordero's wife Amanda Kloots is opening about how his lungs have deteriorated since contracting the novel coronavirus.

On her Instagram stories, the fitness structor said on Thursday that while Cordero's CT scans showed he was "clear of internal bleeding," Cordero's lungs had become "severely damaged to look almost like he's been a smoker for 50 years."

"They're that damaged," she added. "There are holes in his lungs where obviously you don't want holes to be. So this kind of was found because his oxygen count went down and so they kind of went down and deep into the lungs. They cleaned out his lungs again. It wasn't as bad as the couple of days before, but they had to clean out his lungs again."

Kloots added that doctors would be performing a scan of Cordero's lungs with an ink to "get a better picture of what's going on," and "find out from this culture what the fungus is so that they can specifically give the right medication to attack that fungus."

"The doctor that I was speaking to is absolutely wonderful and has the best bedside manner," Kloots continued. "So the doctor told me that if Nick was in his seventies, we'd be having a different conversation. He's 41, and he's been fighting. He's been fighting really hard. We know he's  literally been thrown every curve ball that he could be thrown. He told me that if it was his brother in there that he would not be giving up hope. So I'm not giving up hope. I'm not giving up hope."

Amanda Kloots
| Credit: Amanda Kloots/Instagram

Later on in her update, Kloots talked about her mental and emotional state, saying, "It is very hard. It is definitely the hardest thing I've ever had to go through. It is definitely the hardest thing I think I'll probably ever have to go through. It is hard to keep up my spirits. I'm not gonna lie. I have times where I am absolutely terrified and super scared."

"Sometimes when I hear news like I heard yesterday, I'm just like, 'Really? Like really?' Like it's almost like we can't catch a break over here and that is hard to deal with, is very hard to deal with. I have definitely let myself cry. I definitely let myself scream and rage and just be frustrated," she added.

Nick Cordero and Amanda Kloots
| Credit: D Dipasupil/FilmMagic

But Kloots talked about what's helping her get through this difficult time. "There is an amazing Bible verse in Matthew that says, 'What will one day of worrying add to your life?' Basically saying that if I sit here and worry and get into my thoughts — which I could do, I really could do and I do — it serves me no purpose, right?"

Kloots' update on Instagram comes after the fitness instructor opened up to Gayle King on CBS This Morning Thursday for her first in-depth interview about the actor, during which she shared that she was not expecting Cordero to be admitted to Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center when he first started to show symptoms.

"We drove to the emergency room and we dropped him off, and this is one of the saddest parts, we thought I would see him in two hours," Kloots said, trying to smile through her explanation.

The fitness instructor recalled telling her husband, 41, that she was going to take their son, Elvis Eduardo, for a walk and instructed Cordero to give her a call when he was ready to be picked up.

"We just weren’t thinking," she continued. "I didn’t even give him a kiss or a hug because we were also kind of self-isolating from him because we have this 10-month-old baby and I couldn’t get sick, I’m still breastfeeding."

Kloots said that after an hour of waiting, Cordero called her and said, "'Amanda, they have admitted me, I'm now in a bed with oxygen."

Nick Cordero and Amanda Kloots
| Credit: D Dipasupil/FilmMagic

The actor told Kloots that the hospital "'did a COVID test on me and they told me in a couple of hours they'll have some idea of what will be happening.'"

"I was getting a little worried at this point," Kloots admitted to King, adding, "Nick has never been hospitalized. He has no pre-existing conditions."

"The only time I have ever been in a hospital was to give birth to my son so we’re kind of new to the hospital," she explained. "So anytime I hear you’re admitted, I get a little nervous."

Cordero — who starred in Rock of Ages and Waitress and was nominated for a Tony for his role in Bullets Over Broadway — has been in the intensive care unit since late March.

Nick Cordero, Amanda Kloots
| Credit: Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic

He was first admitted to the hospital when he was “having a hard time breathing” after being diagnosed with pneumonia. At the time, Cordero had tested negative for COVID-19 twice before a third test came back positive.

Shortly after, Cordero became unconscious and was placed in a medically induced coma. He was then hooked up to a ventilator and an ECMO machine to “support his heart and his lungs,” according to Kloots.

Still sedated, Cordero was also put on dialysis to assist his kidneys, but doctors found an infection in his lung and he underwent emergency surgery.

While recovering, Cordero began having issues with blood clots in his right leg, which was preventing blood from circulating to his toes. After the blood thinners he was on to help with the clots started causing other problems, doctors made the difficult decision to amputate Cordero’s leg.

On Tuesday, Kloots shared in an update on her Instagram Story that the Broadway star "ended up getting an infection in his lungs" that spread to his blood, causing him to go into "a little bit of a septic shock" after developing a fever.

Kloots added that Cordero's condition has since stabilized and his "fever is under control."

The new development came almost a day after Kloots said that Cordero's doctors had to postpone plans to remove him off a ventilator and put in a breathing tube due to his fever.

In support of her husband, Kloots has been asking fans and loved ones to sing and dance on social media using the hashtag #WakeUpNick. A GoFundMe page was also recently created by their friends to raise funds for Cordero's medical bills as he continues to undergo treatment.

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