"I really miss sleeping next to him, cuddling into his shoulder and having someone to hold," Amanda Kloots wrote on Instagram

By Eric Todisco
August 24, 2020 09:21 AM
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Amanda Kloots is still grieving the death of her husband, Nick Cordero.

On Sunday, the fitness instructor, 38, shared an old photo of she and Cordero — who died last month from coronavirus complications at the age of 41 — laying down taking a nap together.

In the snap, Cordero — with his eyes opened — smiled at the camera as his wife laid beside him sleeping.

"I found this on Nick's phone," Kloots wrote in her caption. "I don’t remember him taking this picture but know exactly where we are here. I really miss sleeping next to him, cuddling into his shoulder and having someone to hold. ❤️."

Kloots has been open about her grief in the weeks since Cordero's death. Earlier this month, she spoke about the difficult experience of picking up her late husband's ashes.

"It was beyond surreal and horrible. But they’re in my possession and a good friend of mine said some beautiful advice: look at it as you have him with you now,” Kloots said on Instagram. “Which is really a nice way of looking at it, which is true.”

Nick Cordero and Amanda Kloots
amanda kloots/instagram

Kloots and her son Elvis Eduardo, now 16 months, moved into their new house in Los Angeles this month. Cordero was in the middle of finalizing a cross-country move from New York City to the West Coast with the family when the Broadway star contracted coronavirus.

In April, Cordero's friend Zach Braff revealed that Kloots and Elvis had been staying at his guest house amid the actor's hospitalization.

Nick Cordero and Amanda Kloots with their son Elvis Eduardo
Amanda Kloots/instagram

Cordero died on July 5 at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he had been in the intensive care unit for more than 90 days due to complications related to the COVID-19 virus.

During his 13-week hospitalization, the Tony-nominated star faced a series of unpredictable complications that led to septic shock and required him to have his right leg amputated.

In support of Cordero's family, a GoFundMe page was created to raise funds for his medical bills.

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