Mark Hurd is survived by his wife Paula and their two daughters

By Rachel DeSantis
October 18, 2019 05:22 PM
Mark Hurd
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mark Hurd, the CEO of software company Oracle and the one-time boss of Hewlett-Packard, died Friday morning. He was 62.

The Silicon Valley veteran’s death was announced in a note on his personal website, which was written by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison.

“It is with a profound sense of sadness and loss that I tell everyone here at Oracle that Mark Hurd passed away early this morning,” the message read. “Mark was my close and irreplaceable friend, and trusted colleague.”

It continued, “Oracle has lost a brilliant and beloved leader who personally touched the lives of so many of us during his decade at Oracle. All of us will miss Mark’s keen mind and rare ability to analyze.”

Hurd joined the company as president in 2010 just months after resigning from Hewlett-Packard following a sexual harassment accusation against him, according to CNN. Though the company said an investigation cleared him of the claim, Hewlett-Packard said he was found to have violated its standards of conduct policy, CNN reported.

He flourished at Oracle and was promoted to CEO in 2014.

Hurd had taken a leave of absence from Oracle in September for undisclosed health reasons. He wrote in a letter to employees he had decided he needed to “spend time focused on [his] health,” with co-CEO Safra Catz stepping in to take over his responsibilities.

The tech boss started his business career in 1980 as a junior salesman at the National Cash Register Corporation in San Antonino, rising in the ranks over the years before becoming CEO in 2003, according to his website.

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He was born in New York City in 1957, and grew up on the Upper East Side before graduating from Baylor University on a tennis scholarship in 1979.

Hurd is survived by Paula Hurd, his wife of nearly 30 years, and their daughters Kathryn and Kelly, whom Ellison referred to as “the joy of [Hurd’s] life.”

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