Miley Cyrus' "Party in the USA" was also among songs with boosted sales on the day Joe Biden was declared the winner of the presidential election

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We Rise - Memorial Day BBQ And Celebration
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If you want to get a sense of how some Americans are feeling this weekend, look no further than the charts, as YG's 2016 track "FDT" (F— Donald Trump) became the No. 1 song on iTunes following Joe Biden's victory.

Across the country, people were playing the song in public gatherings, including John Legend and Chrissy Teigen, who danced to "FDT" while out celebrating in Los Angeles on Saturday. Rapper Dumbfoundead even tweeted that he got "multiple facetimes from homies in Asia and Europe blasting 'FDT' in the club."

The song even made it to CNN, which captured a mass of people grooving to it out in the streets of Atlanta.

YG himself used "FDT," featuring the late Nipsey Hussle, in a Nov. 7 video edited to look like Biden played the song at a campaign event. "F— TRUMP," the rapper succinctly captioned his tweet.

On Nov. 7, the day Biden was announced as president-elect, "FDT" was downloaded 3,000 times, a 740 percent gain over the song's sales count from the day before, Billboard reported. The sales boosts of "FDT" actually began Nov. 3, the day of the elections, and in the four days leading up to Saturday, the song notched 2,000 downloads, up 233 percent from the previous four-day period. It is currently No. 2 on the iTunes Top Songs, having dipped slightly from the top spot.

Following the track's release in 2016, YG released a follow-up titled "FDT, Part 2" featuring G-Eazy and Macklemore, and earlier this year, the Compton-bred artist dropped "FTP" (F— The Police).

"FDT" wasn't the only song people streamed to toast election results either — Billboard reported that sales of Kool & the Gang's "Celebration," Miley Cyrus' "Party in the U.S.A.," Steam's "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye," and Bill Withers' "Lovely Day" were all up significantly on Nov. 7.

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This story originally appeared on ew.com