Tom Ford Compares Watching 'House of Gucci' to Weathering a Storm: 'I Had Lived Through a Hurricane'

The fashion designer was the rising creative director of the brand in the 1990s and is portrayed briefly in the film

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - NOVEMBER 10: Tom Ford attends the 2021 CFDA Fashion Awards at The Grill & The Pool Restaurants on November 10, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)
Photo: Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty

Tom Ford recently compared his experience of watching House of Gucci to surviving a hurricane.

The 60-year-old fashion designer and filmmaker shared his insight on the movie that opened nationwide Nov. 24 in a piece published by Air Mail Saturday.

"I recently survived a screening of the two-hour-and-37-minute film that is House of Gucci. The shiny, ambitious, beautifully filmed and costumed tale of greed and murder is stunning by the sheer number of stars that have been cast," Ford wrote.

He continued, "The movie rivals the nighttime soap Dynasty for subtlety but does so with a much bigger budget. Directed by master filmmaker Ridley Scott and starring Lady Gaga, Adam Driver, Al Pacino, Jeremy Irons, Jared Leto, and Salma Hayek, the film is … well, I'm still not quite sure what it is exactly, but somehow I felt as though I had lived through a hurricane when I left the theater. Was it a farce or a gripping tale of greed? I often laughed out loud, but was I supposed to?"

<a href="https://people.com/tag/lady-gaga/" data-inlink="true">Lady Gaga</a> stars as Patrizia Reggiani and Adam Driver as Maurizio Gucci in Ridley Scott’s HOUSE OF GUCCI A Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures film Photo credit: Fabio Lovino © 2021 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Lady Gaga. Fabio Lovino

Gaga stars as Patrizia Reggiani in the movie which follows the real-life figure as she hires a hitman to kill her ex-husband, Italian businessman Maurizio Gucci, played by Driver.

The film is based on the Sara Gay Forden book The House of Gucci: A Sensational Story of Murder, Madness, Glamour and Greed.

Ford was the rising creative director of the brand when Gucci was shot and killed in the 1990s and is portrayed briefly in the film by Reeve Carney.

"I must preface my thoughts by stating that my opinion is perhaps biased. I knew Maurizio Gucci well and worked with him for four of the years that are covered in this film. He was murdered on the morning of March 27, 1995, just steps away from my office in Milan," Ford wrote adding that Maurizio was "much more interesting in life than his depiction in the film suggests."

<a href="https://people.com/tag/lady-gaga/" data-inlink="true">Lady Gaga</a> stars as Patrizia Reggiani in Ridley Scott’s HOUSE OF GUCCI A Metro Goldwyn Mayer Pictures film Photo credit: Fabio Lovino © 2021 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Fabio Lovino

In the piece Ford praised Gaga for her role in the film noting that she is the "true star" of it.

"It is her film, and she steals the show. In her often over-the-top portrayal of Patrizia Gucci, her accent migrates occasionally from Milan to Moscow. But who cares? Her performance is spot-on," he wrote.

However, members of the Gucci family have issued a statement on how Gaga's character is portrayed in the film "as a victim trying to survive in a male and male chauvinist corporate culture."

"This couldn't be further from the truth," the statement said, which Variety obtained and reported. The statement claimed that the business was "an inclusive company" that had "several women who held top positions."

"The production of the film did not bother to consult the heirs before describing Aldo Gucci — president of the company for 30 years — and the members of the Gucci family as thugs, ignorant and insensitive to the world around them," the statement said according to Variety. "Gucci is a family that lives honoring the work of its ancestors, whose memory does not deserve to be disturbed to stage a spectacle that is untrue and which does not do justice to its protagonists."

Variety reported that the statement concluded, "the members of the Gucci family reserve the right to take action to protect the name, image and dignity of themselves and their loved ones."

Director Ridley Scott told the New York Times earlier this month that he rarely reads reviews after being "crucified" by an influential movie critic when his 1982 movie Blade Runner was released. "It's why I never read critiques, ever. You have to be your own decider — if you worry about what the audience is thinking and what they may want, that's fatal. A good film will find itself, and now Blade Runner is in the Library of Congress."

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