The Wife actress, 71, wore her late grandmother's ring to the Screen Actors Guild Awards to honor her unfulfilled dream of becoming an actress

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January 27, 2019 07:10 PM

Glenn Close chose a special piece of jewelry for the 2019 SAG Awards.

The Wife actress, 71, wore her late grandmother’s ring to the Screen Actors Guild Awards to honor her unfulfilled dream of becoming an actress. Close told PEOPLE’s Jeremy Parsons about carrying on her grandmother’s dream.

“This here is my grandmother’s wedding ring and she wanted to be an actress and I only knew that after she died,” she explained. “She never would have been allowed to do that. I feel like I’m carrying the women in my family who were wonderful mothers and wives, but could have had more personal expression probably.”

Close is nominated in the female actor in a leading role category up against Lady Gaga for A Star Is Born, Olivia Colman for The Favourite, Emily Blunt for Mary Poppins Returns and Melissa McCarthy for Can You Ever Forgive Me?

RELATED: Glenn Close Feels ‘as Sexual as I Ever Have’ at 71: Losing Your Sexuality Is ‘a Myth’

  • The official pre-show, People, Entertainment Weekly and TNT Red Carpet Live: 25th Screen Actors Guild Awards, will livestream beginning at 5:30 p.m. ET/2:30 p.m. PT on PEOPLE.com, EW.com, tntdrama.com/sag-awards and sagawards.org, in addition to being broadcast live in Times Square.

In The Wife, Close plays a woman living in the shadow of her Nobel Prize winning husband, played by Jonathan Pryce, also 71. The movie has an early sex scene between the two, showing a older couple becoming intimate. And Close was thrilled by it.

“It’s one of the great myths that you lose your sexuality as you get older,” she told The Guardian, adding that both she and Pryce showed up to set in their “jammies” before shooting the sex scene.

“I feel as free and as creative, as sexual and as eager, as I ever have,” Close continued. “And it’s ironic because I’m thinking: ‘How much time do I have left now?’ There are so many things I’m interested in doing. It’s one of those ironies, I suppose, that we sometimes start feeling comfortable in our own skin only late in our lives, but hopefully with enough time to benefit from it.”

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