The beauty mogul showed fans how to cleanse using her Kylie Skin Foaming Face Wash, but only washed for about 10 seconds, which angered some of her followers

By Kaitlyn Frey
May 30, 2019 11:58 AM
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Fans are questioning Kylie Jenner‘s knowledge of skincare after the beauty mogul posted a video washing her face with the new Kylie Skin Foaming Face Wash for only 10 seconds.

The 21-year-old star, who debuted (and sold out) her skincare line last week, shared a 30-second clip on the Kylie Skin Twitter and Instagram account to show fans how to use the new cleanser, which she recommends applying “morning and night.”

In the clip, Jenner uses a floral face filter and rubs the foamy formula over her skin for about 10 seconds before rinsing with water and wiping her face dry with a white towel.

However, fans quickly called out Jenner’s face washing technique by saying she didn’t cleanse long enough to fully remove makeup. Many also noted that when the star wiped her face dry, foundation residue transferred onto the towel, indicating that she had not cleansed for long enough.

“You washed your face for 2 seconds. You’re using a filter. You still had makeup come off on the damn towel. LEARN HOW TO WASH YOUR FACE. God damn. How hard is this? Basic hygiene y’all 🤦🏻‍♀️,” one person tweeted to Jenner.

Credit: Kylie Skin/Twitter

Another person tweeted: “Omg dying at @KylieJenner video where she washes her face with her skincare and the rag has so much makeup on it:,) girl what?”

“20 second wash + no exfoliation = leftover makeup & dirt. Smh,” a Twitter user replied.

Other people tweeted to Jenner to say that she needs to wash her face for 30 seconds to a full minute, not only a few seconds. “You must wash your face for 60 seconds @KylieJenner not .5 seconds,” they said.

Someone else added: “Love you Kylie Jenner but if you’re showing people how to wash their face with your products, do it properly. Putting cleanser on your skin for 2 sec & washing it off is not effective in any way, shape, or form. Cleanser needs to be used for at LEAST 30 sec to work effectively.”

However, it is likely Jenner only cleansed for a few seconds to film the short video clip and may normally wash her face more thoroughly while not on camera.

This isn’t the first time Jenner’s gotten backlash over her Kylie Skin line. Before the star’s collection even launched, fans called her out for using a controversial ingredient in her Walnut Face Scrub.

The scrub uses crushed walnut as a physical exfoliant, which many fans claim is too abrasive on the skin and can cause more harm than good.

“Kinda shocked Kylie’s scrub is a walnut scrub. That sounds so 2013 right? Lmao I don’t mean it in a bad way but aren’t those types of scrubs too abrasive for the skin? Don’t they cause like tiny scratches? I feel like I don’t see them anymore,” beauty influencer Kathleen Fuentes tweeted.

Another person tweeted: “Soooo bad for the skin. Please check out @LaBeautyologist !!! NO scrubs, y’all.” Someone else said: “I gave up on physical/ scrub exfoliant a long time ago. Acid exfoliators are so much better and they’re not abrasive. There are acid lip exfoliators in the market but they’re mostly Asian products.”

According to N.Y.C. dermatologist and The Beauty of Dirty Skin author, Dr. Whitney Bowe, walnut face scrubs won’t irritate skin in theory if they’re “ground into a fine powder and tested on skin in a clinical trial,” but in general, she does not recommend physical exfoliators to her patients.

“Nuts or nut shells can create micro-tears in the skin, damaging the delicate barrier and triggering inflammation which can exacerbate skin conditions like acne, eczema, rosacea or even lead to premature aging,” Dr. Bowe says. “One of the biggest skincare mistakes people make is to over-scrub or over-exfoliate their skin.”

Instead, she recommends chemical exfoliation, which use ingredients like alpha hydroxy acid (AHAs) or beta hydroxy acid (BHAs) to dissolve away the dead layer of skin. “It’s more gentle and controlled exfoliation, especially if you have sensitive skin. Physical scrubs are more prone to error, like people pushing too hard which causes them to overdo it.”