Last month, conservative commentator took a jab at the pop icon's gender fluid style after he wore a gown on the cover of Vogue's December issue

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Harry Styles for variety
Credit: Parker Woods for Variety

The conversation about Harry Styles wearing a dress on the cover of Vogue isn’t over just yet...

After conservative commentator Candace Owens slammed the singer's gender fluid Vogue spread — and called for society to "bring back manly men" — in a controversial tweet last month, Styles seemingly responded by using her direct quote in an Instagram caption on Wednesday.

“Bring back manly men,” the "Watermelon Sugar" singer, 26, wrote alongside a photo of himself wearing a pleat hem suit for his new Variety Hitmaker of the Year cover shoot.

harry styles Variety
Harry Styles on the cover of Variety
| Credit: Parker Woods for Variety
Harry Styles for variety
Harry Styles
| Credit: Parker Woods for Variety

Owens stood her ground, though, responding to the clap back with a statement of her own just hours later: “When people try to tell me I don’t have influence, and then @Harry_Styles dedicates an entire post to my tweet. I inspire global conversation “#BringBackManlyMen,” she tweeted, adding, “Shots fired” with several laughing face Emojis.

Styles' notoriously loyal fanbase came to his defense, with one person tweeting, "this has been ur 15 minutes of fame so shush," in a reply to Owens.

Harry Styles for variety
Credit: Parker Woods for Variety

"i mean you tweeting all of this isn’t going to stop him dressing however he wants... just give up at this point," another Twitter user added. A third fan joked, "this is just embarrassing."

The author also posted a photo of Styles' portraying a British soldier in the 2017 film Dunkirk with the hashtag, "#BBMM."

Harry Styles for variety
Harry Styles
| Credit: Parker Woods for Variety

New York politician Frangell Basora tweeted that Owens' "hateful comments are inspiring violence against gender-nonconforming people and it is atrocious."

"This isn’t something to be proud of, @RealCandaceO. It isn’t a discussion when people’s safety and lives are put at-risk," he continued. To which Owens' responded: "The Left is literally trying to claim the expression “Bring Back Manly Men” is an act of violence. You need your head checked, buddy."

Earlier this month, Owens spoke out against the Vogue cover, voicing her concern about the feminization of men and calling gender-fluid fashion trends an "outright attack."

"There is no society that can survive without strong men," she tweeted. "The East knows this. In the west, the steady feminization of our men at the same time that Marxism is being taught to our children is not a coincidence. It is an outright attack. Bring back manly men."

Styles donned a lace-trimmed dress and tuxedo jacket crafted by his friend, muse and Gucci's creative director, Alessandro Michele, on the cover of the December issue. The headline "Harry Styles Makes His Own Rules" accompanies an idyllic photo of the 26-year-old singer blowing up a balloon.

And the same message is conveyed inside the issue, where Styles opened up about challenging traditional gender norms and expressing himself through fashion.

"Clothes are there to have fun with and experiment with and play with. What's really exciting is that all of these lines are just kind of crumbling away," he told the outlet. "When you take away 'There's clothes for men and there's clothes for women,’ once you remove any barriers, obviously you open up the arena in which you can play."