British Vogue tapped 23 top models for the charity auction, which benefits NHS Charities Together and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

By Hanna Flanagan
June 09, 2020 09:50 AM
Advertisement
Gigi Hadid

Some of the world’s most stylish models are opening their wardrobes for a good cause.

Last week, British Vogue announced it has partnered with luxury resale store Hardly Ever Worn It for an online auction of looks handpicked by 23 fashion icons including Gigi Hadid, Christy Turlington and Helena Christensen from their own closets.

All funds raised from the celeb-backed initiative will go towards NHS Charities Together and the NAACP, amid the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and social unrest around the world following the death of George Floyd. The auction opens on Tuesday, June 9, at 2pm BST and closes Friday, June 12, at 2pm BST.

Christy Turlington Burns
Christy Turlington Burns

The virtual event, entitled "The Way We Wore," corresponds to a feature in British Vogue’s July 2020 issue, where each model styled the look they selected for the auction in a socially distanced selfie. Along with treasured pieces from the model’s personal wardrobes, bidders will also be able to purchase limited-edition prints of the photos snapped during lock-down.

In the British Vogue article, the models shared a few sentences of encouragement during this difficult time and explained the significance of each piece.

Christensen donated a vintage Christian Dior dress she once wore to an Oscars party: "History is in every thread, and it oozes an elegance and glamour that hardly exists anymore," the 90s legend wrote.

Helena Christensen
Helena Christensen

Meanwhile, Lily Aldridge showed how to style her contribution, "the perfect LBD," from her home in Nashville. And Joan Smalls posed nearly nude with a Givenchy bag that has been her go-to for years: "[It's] traveled everywhere with me."

Lily Aldridge
Joan Smalls
Joan Smalls

A pregnant Hadid submitted a mirror selfie with boyfriend Zayn Malik: "I appreciate the opportunity to give back in this way, and hope that whoever ends up with these pieces - the Fenty top and skirt and Dior saddlebag - really enjoys them, knowing that their contribution will help those struggling due to Covid-19," she wrote. "Zayn and I send our love and best wishes to everyone.”

Gigi Hadid

Turlington snapped her photo from Long Island, modeling a printed, billowy dress she wore to the 2018 H&M Conscious Exclusive campaign.

"I love that it’s made from repurposed materials, and because Earth Day was approaching when I took this selfie," she explained. It seemed like the perfect piece to pass along."

Editor in chief Edward Enninful announced the timely project in an Instagram post on Friday, saying he has been “so touched to see how my own industry has been rallying during the pandemic.”

“Some of fashion’s leading models are taking part in a special British Vogue project to raise money for NHS Charities Together and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, by each selecting a look from their own wardrobe to auction off,” he wrote. “I am delighted to reveal a galaxy of catwalk stars who have self-documented – in spectacular style – and written about treasured pieces in the July issue of the magazine.”

Enninful continued, “Their at-home photographs are so joyful, and their choices so personal, I hope you will all be encouraged to bid and raise funds for these worthy causes.”

British Vogue's The Way We Wore auction, in partnership with HEWI, launches at 2PM BST on Tuesday 9th June at Vogue.hardlyeverwornit.com and will be live for 72 hours 

And "The Way We Wore" isn't the only event auctioning off designer styles for charity.

Last month, celebrity stylist Elizabeth Stewart partnered with eBay for a virtual event called "Chic Relief," where bidders won red carpet gowns worn by Julia Roberts, Jennifer Lopez, Beyoncé, Cardi B and more.

"Chic Relief" raised $83,545.76 (the auction itself raised $41,772.88, and was matched by eBay). 100% of proceeds were donated to Direct Relief, a nonprofit organization that is providing protective gear and other support to front line medical workers worldwide amid the pandemic.