The global ambassador for the Estee Lauder Companies' Breast Cancer campaign chats with People about this year's initiative

By Jackie Fields
October 24, 2018 03:42 PM
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Elizabeth Hurley wants you to indulge in a little me-time.

“So often, we women put our needs at the bottom of the list,” Hurley told PEOPLE exclusively. “But it’s really important for us to understand that if we’re going to be caretakers, we have to take care of ourselves.”

For the actress, that means carving out 20 minutes nearly every single evening for a bath.

“Almost every day I have a long, hot soak. That’s my time. My mother did the same. She used to call it her think tank,” Hurley explains.

The actress is also de-stressing by learning to detach from her cell phone.

“It’s difficult, but I don’t worry about it. I mean, yes, emails are crashing in. But, I’m feeling good about not answering people within seconds. Business was pretty good before we did that, so I think it’s just about understanding that we don’t need an instant answer from someone.”

Of course for Hurley, who’s been a global ambassador for the Estée Lauder Companies’ Breast Cancer campaign for more than 20 years, self-care is about so much more than baths and cell-phone bans. As the company enters it’s 26th year advocating for breast cancer awareness, Hurley is using her star power to voice the importance of annual mammograms help the company call for an end to the disease.

“We’re really concentrating on fundraising so that we can finance more research to find a cure,” says Hurley of this year’s campaign. In addition to its vast assortment of product offerings that give back various amounts to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the company has also launched hashtag #TimeToEndBreastCancer as a call to action.

Credit: Gary Gershoff/WireImage

And you don’t have to be social media-savvy to spread the word, says Hurley. “I personally talk to all my friends about breast health. I’ll say, ‘When was your last mammogram?’ And implore them to check their own breasts as well. Sometimes they squirm, but it’s a conversation you have to have. So, I make it my mission.”