"It's been so fun designing these shirts, and I hope everyone loves it as much as I do," Behati Prinsloo tells PEOPLE exclusively

By Melody Chiu
December 03, 2019 10:00 AM
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Just in time for the holidays, Behati Prinsloo is giving fans a fun gift option — while also making a difference in her native Namibia.

The supermodel, 31, is releasing a limited-edition T-shirt line she personally designed for M. Fredric. Proceeds will go to the Save the Rhino Trust through the Wildlife Conversation Network.

“My family and I are proud to support the trackers in Namibia, protecting the last free-roaming population of black rhinos left on earth. Being a native of Namibia, this means so much to me,” Prinsloo, who has two daughters with husband Adam Levine, tells PEOPLE exclusively. “I need my girls to see the Africa I know. It’s been so fun designing these shirts, and I hope everyone loves it as much as I do.”

Behati Prinsloo wearing her T-shirt line
courtesy behati prinsloo

Earlier this year, Prinsloo traveled back home and learned firsthand how trackers and members of the community are working to save the black rhino, critically endangered animal.

“[Dusty] has decided that rhinos are her favorite animal and when she grows up, she’s going to help me save them,” she said about her 3-year-old daughter with Adam Levine. (They welcomed another daughter, Gio, last February.)

RELATED: Adam Levine and Behati Prinsloo’s Daughter Loves Rhinos — and the Model Is Trying to Save Them

“Right now, it’s quite dreamlike for my girls, but if we don’t act now to save rhinos, this dream will end with the extinction of the species,” she explained, saying that there are just 10 years to save black rhinos from becoming extinct.

During her conservation trip, Prinsloo reminisced about her childhood camping with her parents. This time, she got to explore the land with conservation advocates and “rhino rangers.”

“Their passion and dedication to keep these animals alive is infectious,” she said. “It gives me so much hope and makes me even more proud to be Namibian.”

While the number of black rhinos has doubled since its historic low of 2,500 in the mid-1990s, the animal species is still considered critically endangered by the WWF.

“Three rhinos are killed every day for their horns, which are nothing more than keratin, the same substance as our hair and nails,” Prinsloo said. “Their horns don’t possess any magical healing powers and anyone who thinks that owning one somehow bestows status is simply wrong.”

“They are solitary, marching to the beat of their own drum — like the punk rockers of the animal world!” Prinsloo added, describing her daughter’s favorite animal. “They avoid conflict, and for me, this was a lesson in the power and restraint of Mother Nature, a lesson we could all learn from.”

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