Woods and Manning have played together in pro-ams before

By Lindsay Kimble
May 29, 2019 01:43 PM
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A match made in heaven.

Peyton Manning and Tiger Woods are, once again, paired up for a pro-am match, this time at the Memorial Tournament at Muirfield Village in Dublin, Ohio, on Wednesday.

Woods and Manning, both 43, previously played together in pro-ams in 2005 at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, and in 2009 at the Quail Hollow Championship, according to USA Today.

Should he win this weekend, the victory will mark Woods’ sixth total at the tournament, according to Golf.com. He hasn’t won the Memorial since 2012, however.

Woods and Manning are friends but have a healthy rivalry on the golf course. In an interview with the Golf Channel, the retired NFL star admitted that he’s trash-talked Woods previously.

But, Manning noted of the golfer, “He likes to give it out more than anybody.”

Still, Manning has great respect from Woods. As he told the Los Angeles Times in a recent interview, “I know from the injury standpoint how hard he worked, how determined he was, the adjustments he had to make.”

The golfer has had quite the eventful past few months.

In April, Woods secured his fifth Masters Tournament win — his first major win in 11 years, after he placed first in the 2008 U.S. Open.

The win also marked Woods’ fifth green jacket. Only retired player Jack Nicklaus, who has won the Masters six times, has more.

David Dermer/AP/Shutterstock

Said Manning after Woods’ Masters win, “I really think it’s just kind of the beginning. I don’t think that’s the last time he’s going to get crowned.”

The athlete talked about his own injuries and recovery, noting that Woods went through the “same thing” with his multiple back surgeries.

“He had to stop playing,” Manning told the Times. “Because you don’t want to do that for too long, throwing bad or hitting bad, because that kind of becomes your new norm. He deserves so much credit for being able to overcome the mental part of not hitting great shots, and hitting bad shots.”

Continued Manning, “The fact that he’s overcome that tells you even more, just how impressed people should be about how far he’s come.”