The ten athletes were selected to represent the some 65-million displaced people around the world

By Tiare Dunlap
August 11, 2016 04:55 PM

The first all-refugee team in Olympic history received a stadium-wide standing ovation at the opening ceremony of the Rio Olympics Friday night.

These ten athletes from Syria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan and Ethiopia were selected to represent the some 65-million displaced people around the world.

Here’s where you can see them compete and how they’ve fared so far.

What’s his story?
Anis was a competitive swimmer in Syria until he and his family fled the country in 2011 to avoid the then 20-year-old’s likely conscription into the army. After living in Istanbul the family moved to Belgium in 2015.

What has he said about the Olympics?
“It’s a wonderful feeling to compete in the Olympics,” Anis said, according to BBC Sports. “I don’t want to wake up from this dream.”

How has he done?
Anis set a personal best in the men’s 100-meter freestyle on Wednesday and received a standing ovation. On Thursday, he clocked a 56.23 in the men’s 100-meter butterfly.

What’s his story?
Biel fled Nasir, South Sudan alone as a teenager to escape Sudan’s bloody civil war in 2005. He ended up in Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp where he said running gave him a sense of belonging.

What has he said about the Olympics?
Biel, who began running competitively just one year ago, said he sees his participation in the Games as a chance to be an ambassador for refugees everywhere. “Even if I will not get gold or silver I will show the world that being a refugee, you can do something,” he told UNCHR.

When will he compete?
Biel will compete in the men’s 800-meter heats on Friday.

What’s her story?
When she was a young child, Mabika was separated from her parents by fighting in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. She discovered judo while living in a center for displaced children and excelled in the sport. She and her teammate Popole Misenga sought asylum in Brazil while competing in the World Judo Championships in Rio in 2013.

What has she said about the Olympics?
“I’m representing many nations and my victory is a victory for all refugees in the world. I lost, but I’m here,” Mabika said after her match, according to The Guardian. “The fight did not end today. The fight is not only judo, the fight is life.”

How has she done?
Mabika was knocked out in the first round of the under 70-kilogram division by Israel’s Linda Bolder on Wednesday.

What’s his story?
After violence and political issues drove Kinde from his native country, he sought asylum in Luxembourg in 2013. He reached the qualifying standards for Rio during the Frankfurt Marathon in October 2015.

What has he said about the Olympics?
“I’ve won many races but I didn’t have a nationality to participate in the Olympic Games or the European championships,” Kinde said, according to the Rio 2016 site. “It’s very good news for refugee athletes that Olympic Solidarity have given us this chance to participate here.”

When will he compete?
Kinde will compete in the men’s marathon on Sunday, August 21.

What’s her story?
Mardini and older sister Sarah fled Syria in August and boarded an inflatable boat headed from Turkey to Lesbos. When the boat carrying 20 people began taking on water, the two sisters jumped out and clung to its side, furiously kicking to safety, the Associated Press reported. “In Syria I worked in a swimming pool to watch people not drowning, so if I let anyone drown or die I would not forgive myself,” Mardini said.

The sisters eventually made it to Austria and then Germany before moving into a refugee shelter in Berlin. There, a local charity put them in touch with a nearby swimming club.

What has she said about the Olympics?
“I want to represent all the refugees because I want to show everyone that, after the pain, after the storm, comes calm days,” she said. “I want to inspire them to do something good in their lives.”

How has she done?
Mardini won her first heat in the 100-meter butterfly on Saturday, but her time was not fast enough for her to progress. On Wednesday, she came in 7th place in her heat in the 100-meter freestyle.

What’s his story?
Misenga was found wandering in the rainforest at age 9 after his mother was murdered during conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2013, he and teammate Mabika sought asylum in Brazil while competing in the World Judo Championships in Rio.

What has he said about the Olympics?
“When I entered the Olympic arena, I thought nobody would cheer for me, and then I saw all the Brazilians rooting for me,” Misenga told SB Nation. “I was very emotional. I felt something different.”

How has he done?
Misenga beat India’s Avtar Singh in his opening match in the men’s judo under 90-kg category on Wednesday. In the second round, he was knocked out by South Korea’s Donghan Gwak.

What’s his story?
Chiengjiek, from Bentiu South Sudan lost his father in the Second Sudanese Civil War in 1999. He fled South Sudan as a teenager in 2002 to escape the war and began running at Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp where he trained despite the fact that he didn’t have shoes.

What has he said about the Olympics?
“By running well, I am doing something good to help others – especially refugees,” he said. “Maybe among them are athletes with talent, but who did not yet get any opportunities. We are refugees like that, and some of us have been given this opportunity to go to Rio. We have to look back and see where our brothers and sisters are, so if one of them also has talent, we can bring them to train with us and also make their lives better.”

When will he compete?
Chiengjiek will race in the men’s 400-meter heats on Sunday, August 14.

What’s her story?
Lohalith fled the war in Sudan with her aunt at age six and arrived at Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp in 2002. She hasn’t seen her parents since and she hopes that through running she will be able to reunite with her family.

What has she said about the Olympics?
“I’m happy because it will be the first time refugees are represented in the Olympics,” she said. “It will inspire other refugees because wherever they are they will see that they are not just the ‘other people’. They will have that encouragement that they can compete in anyway.”

When will she compete?
Lohalith will be competing in the women’s 1500-meter heats on Saturday, August 13

What’s her story?
Lokonyen fled the war in South Sudan as a child and arrived at the Kakuma refugee camp in 2002. Her parents returned to South Sudan in 2008, leaving Lokonyen and her siblings at the refugee camp. She started running barefoot through the camp and only started running with shoes one year ago.

What has she said about the Olympics?
“I will be very happy to hold that refugee flag because this is where I started my life,” she said. “I will be representing my people in Rio. Maybe if I succeed, I can come back and conduct a race that can promote peace and bring people together.”

When will she compete?
Lokonyen will compete in the women’s 800-meter heats on Wednesday, August 17.

What’s his story?
Lokoro fled the war in South Sudan in 2006, joining his mother at Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp. He soon joined the camp’s running program and was selected to compete in the 1500-meter.

What has he said about the Olympics?
“I am so happy. I know I am racing on behalf of refugees,” he said. I was one of those refugees in the camp and now I have reached somewhere special. If I perform well, I will use that to help support my family and my people.”

When will he compete?
Lokoro will compete in the men’s 1500-meter heats on Tuesday, August 16

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