"No one really knows the sacrifices that you make just to be good," Naomi Osaka says in the first trailer for her self-titled Netflix documentary

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The first look at Naomi Osaka's self-titled Netflix documentary has been released.

The tennis star, 23, gives fans an intimate look at her life and career in her three-part series directed by 2021 Oscar nominee Garrett Bradley. "No one really knows the sacrifices that you make just to be good," Osaka says in the trailer, which dropped on Tuesday.

Naomi Osaka follows the two years after the athlete defeated Serena Williams to win the U.S. Open in 2018, when her career and fame skyrocketed. "Before I won U.S. Open, so many people told my dad that I would never be anything," Osaka recalls in the documentary which gives viewers unprecedented access into her life.

The July 16 premiere of the three 40-minute episodes will come a week before the Tokyo Olympics are set to begin. The Games will be Osaka's return to tennis after she withdrew from the French Open in May and Wimbledon in June, citing efforts to preserve her mental health. Osaka previously shared that she's suffered from depression since 2018.

"I think the amount of attention that I get is kind of ridiculous. No one prepares you for that," Osaka says in the doc, later adding, "I don't know I feel like I'm struggling."

Naomi Osaka
Credit: netflix
Netflix
Credit: netflix

The Netflix project will also show Osaka's close bond with her family, including her parents Leonard Francois and Tamaki Osaka. "Growing up, all I was thinking was I want my mom to be happy. I want her to stop working. She would work overtime, she would sleep in her car. And for me, that was my whole point of playing tennis," the superstar details of her Japanese mother.

"My dad has always been proud of where he comes from," she says of her Haitian father. "Whenever I'm in hard situations, he's always told me my ancestors were on this ship for like 40 days. I use that as strength."

Highlights from the two years chronicled in the doc include her evolution as a social activist and leader off the court. "I always had this pressure to maintain this squeaky image, but now, I don't care what anyone else has to say," Osaka declares.

One of the ways she ascended to global acclaim was during the 2020 U.S. Open when she wore seven different face masks with the names of Black victims of police brutality (Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Trayvon Martin and more) for each round of the annual tournament. "None of these deaths have to happen and I just want everyone to know the names," Osaka says in the doc, which also features footage of her at a march.

Naomi Osaka
Credit: netflix

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Naomi Osaka
Credit: netflix

But as her star rises in sports and beyond, Osaka wonders: "For so long, I've tied winning to my worth as a person. To anyone that would know me, they know me for being a tennis player, so like, what am I if I'm not a good tennis player?"

Also in the trailer, the tagline, "We are all tested but it's how you overcome that defines who you become," summarizes Osaka's career motto thus far as she continues to find her voice.

"The series is about Naomi's journey, within a snapshot of her life, but it's also about life's purpose, about personal worth, about the courage that it takes to allow one's personal values to inform their work and vice versa," director Bradley said in a statement. "More than anything, I'd hope people can feel the power of empathy and to feel encouraged to take chances in life, perhaps especially in moments where the stakes can feel impossibly high."

Osaka said in a statement, "I feel like the platform that I have right now is something that I used to take for granted, and for me I feel like I should be using it for something. I believe, instead of following, you have to make your own path."

Naomi Osaka will premiere globally on Netflix on July 16.