The professional boxer previously thought he wasn't allowed to vote because of his felony record

By Georgia Slater
September 23, 2020 10:28 AM
Advertisement
Mike Tyson
| Credit: Michael Tullberg/Getty

Mike Tyson will be casting his ballot for the first time in the 2020 presidential election.

On Tuesday, the professional boxer shared on Twitter that he will be voting in the upcoming election after spending years thinking he was unable to participate.

"This election will be my 1st time voting," the 54-year-old wrote. "I never thought I could because of my felony record."

"I'm proud to finally vote," he added.

The athlete announced the news alongside a link to register to vote and the hashtag "#NationalVoterRegistrationDay."

In 1992, Tyson was convicted and sentenced to six years in prison, CNN reported. He was charged with one count of rape and two counts of deviant sexual conduct. He was released after three years.

While Tyson was unable to vote in previous elections, a new law that took effect in his home state of Nevada in 2019 now allows him to cast his ballot.

Under the law (Assembly Bill 431), any Nevada resident who is convicted of a felony is immediately restored their right to vote upon the individual's release from prison, according to information on the state's website.

Not only is Tyson returning to the polls, but he will also return to the boxing ring this fall.

As PEOPLE confirmed in July, Roy Jones Jr. and Tyson agreed to face each other in an exhibition match, set to take place Nov. 28 after it was rescheduled from its initial date in September.

At the height of their success, both men were considered two of the best ever to enter the ring — Jones ended his career with 66 wins and nine losses, while Tyson took a bow with a 50-6 record (including 44 knockouts). He competed from 1985 to 2005.

The match is being produced as a part of Tyson's Legends Only League, which supports older athletes looking to return to their sports.

The Legends Only League will back boxers, as well as athletes in other sports, in the hopes of bringing "the best of the best back into the ring, onto the court, and back on the field."

In the weeks before the fight became official, Tyson had published videos of his training on social media. In one video, uploaded in May, Tyson showed off his incredible punching power in a montage of workouts before looking into the camera to announce, "I'm back."