Jordan Olerud was born with a unique chromosome syndrome called tri-some 2p, 5p-

By Eric Todisco
March 01, 2020 04:15 PM
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Credit: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

MLB All-Star John Olerud’s 19-year-old daughter Jordan has died after battling a rare chromosome disorder since birth.

Jordan’s death was confirmed on Sunday by Jay Horwitz, vice president of alumni public relations for the New York Mets, the team which John, 51, played for from 1997-1999.

“So sad to hear about the passing of Jordan Olerud. To honor John, Kelly and Jordan you can contribute at http://JordanFund.org. Services for Jordan will be this Saturday,” Horwitz wrote on Twitter.

Jordan was born in August 2000 with a unique chromosome syndrome called tri-some 2p, 5p-, which means she had an extra second chromosome and was missing part of her fifth chromosome, according to Today.

John and his wife Kelly, who also have a son together, launched the Jordan Fund in 2003.

“John & Kelly have experienced first hand what an enormous task it is to care for a child with special needs, and what a huge burden it can place on families,” the foundation’s website states.

Over the years, the foundation has helped give grants to families unable to cover the medical costs for a child who is also diagnosed with the rare disease. In 2014, the foundation donated $50,000 to Inspiration Playground to create an all-inclusive playground in Bellevue, Washington, according to a 2014 press release from Rotary Club of Bellevue.

John previously told The Boston Globe in 2005 — the same year he retired from the MLB — how much his daughter inspired him.

“I’m constantly amazed at her disposition,” he said. “She’s uncomfortable, she’s having a hard time… but yet, she’s got a smile for you. I’m really blessed to have a child like her.”

John played for the Toronto Blue Jays, New York Mets, Seattle Mariners, New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox during his MLB career, and was named All-Star in 1993 and 2001. In 2007, he was inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame.