As the clock ticks on the royal birth, speculation is rising that Kate might have to undergo medical intervention

By Simon Perry Monique Jessen
April 27, 2015 09:40 AM
Lia Toby/WENN

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As Princess Kate passes her speculated due date, she may be considering an induction, experts have predicted.

Kate, 33, who is likely several days overdue will be discussing her options with her medical team.

“The decision to induce is based on how she is feeling, her history and how the baby is managing – it’s a constant dialogue between the doctors, midwives and Kate,” pregnancy expert Zita West tells PEOPLE.

While her son Prince George is believed to have been about a week late when he arrived on July 22, 2013, playing the waiting game will be no easier for Kate the second time round.

“It’s always hard because the due date is like this magic number that you wait for and every day after that you do get a bit fed up,” says London-based West whose clients include Kate Winslet and fellow-royal mom Sophie, Countess of Wessex.

During her last set of public appearances, Kate told well-wishers that she was expecting her child in “mid to late April.”

Palace aides and officials at the local Westminster Council have planned the parking and other arrangements around St. Mary’s hospital with that in mind. There are restrictions on parking on roads about the hospital running from April 15 through April 30.

While some reports have suggested the date was Sunday, April 26, a source in government circles has told The Daily Telegraph that Kate s due date has passed. It was April 23, the source said.

Moreover, a source who has given birth in the same private Lindo Wing of St. Mary’s has said that consultants at the hospital don t normally allow pregnancies to go more than a week overdue.

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“She has likely been given a date and if nothing has happened by then, they will induce,” says West, who used to work at the Lindo Wing herself.

According to the Health and Social Care Information Centre in the U.K., the current induction rate is up 1.7%, with 25% of deliveries in the U.K. being induced between 2013 and 2014.

As for whether the expectant mom is listening to any of the traditional old wives tales on how to bring on labor, West is skeptical: “Eating a curry, exercising, drinking special teas, I don’t know if any of those things work, – you can do all sorts of things but ultimately when the baby is ready, the baby is ready.”

Keep reading People.com for more on the royal birth.

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