The monarch cut a lonely figure in the pews of St. George's Chapel for the funeral of her husband of 73 years, Prince Philip

By Michelle Tauber
April 17, 2021 11:20 AM
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Queen Elizabeth mourned her husband Prince Philip on Saturday, sitting alone in the pews of St. George's Chapel.

The arresting image, a poignant coda to the couple's remarkable 73-year marriage, was one of many heartbreaking moments throughout the funeral of Prince Philip, who died at age 99 on April 9.

Listen below to the episode of our daily podcast PEOPLE Every Day for more on Prince Philip's funeral.

Following the close of the hour-long ceremony — which was striking for both its military precision and heartfelt emotion — Prince William and Prince Harry, who were reunited at the funeral for the first time in more than a year, could be seen walking and talking together.

Along with the Queen's solitary spotlight, there were small moments of sorrow, too: Before the ceremony began, Philip's cap and gloves had been placed on his carriage on the grounds of Windsor Castle, a touching tribute to one of his beloved passions in life. A small red pot that could be seen on the carriage had been long used by Philip to hold the sugar lumps he fed his horses after carriage driving.

The funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Prince Philip's cap and gloves atop his carriage.
| Credit: Kirsty O'Connor/PA Wire/Shutterstock

Numerous military-led tributes also gave the day a personal gravitas, from the saluting guards to the trumpeters to Philip's Naval cap and sword atop his flag-draped casket. Philip, who was titled the Duke of Edinburgh, proudly served in the Royal Navy during WWII.

Members of the armed forces take their positions during the funeral service of Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Members of the armed forces take their positions during the funeral service of Britain's Prince Philip.
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Philip's custom Land Rover hearse hit another emotional chord, with its military-green color and specially designed touches by the Duke himself.

The Funeral Of Prince Philip, Duke Of Edinburgh
Prince Philip's custom Land Rover hearse.
| Credit: Kirsty O'Connor/WPA Pool/Getty Images

"The Duke of Edinburgh was closely involved in the planning of his own funeral. As a result, tomorrow's ceremony will involve a number of unique touches which reflect his life and work," a statement read on the royal family's official Instagram page on Friday. "Many of the moments choreographed by The Duke demonstrate his lifelong commitment to the Armed Forces."

Prince Philip casket
Prince Philip's casket, adorned with his personal flag.

Philip chose much of the stirring music for the day, including the hymn "Eternal Father, Strong to Save" by William Whiting, which was written in 1860 and is also known as "For Those in Peril on the Sea" or the Royal Navy Hymn.

Prince Philip
Prince Philip's funeral at St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.
| Credit: Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images

But it was the royal family's heartfelt grief that most reverberated throughout the historic chapel. At one point, a visibly distraught Sophie, Countess of Wessex — who was seated alongside her husband, Prince Edward (Philip's youngest son) and their children Lady Louise and James, Viscount Severn — removed her mask to wipe her tears.

Prince Philip Funeral
Sophie, Countess of Wessex, at the funeral of Prince Philip with husband Prince Edward and children James, Viscount Severn and Lady Louise.
| Credit: Yui Mok - WPA Pool/Getty Images

During the first procession, Philip's eldest son — and the Queen's direct heir — Prince Charles followed directly behind his father's coffin. Next to Charles was his sister Princess Anne, the Queen and Philip's second eldest child and only daughter.

The Funeral Of Prince Philip, Duke Of Edinburgh Is Held In Windsor
Prince Charles leads the funeral procession.
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The funeral of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Prince Philip's funeral procession
| Credit: Tim Rooke/Shutterstock

Their younger brother, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward, made up the second line in the procession. They were followed by three of Prince Philip's grandsons: William, Peter Phillips (Princess Anne's son) and Harry.

At the conclusion of the service, the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin was lowered into the Royal Vault and the National Anthem was sung by the choir.

With the service has finished and the royal family departed from the chapel, everything now becomes private.

"There is a desire for some privacy," a Buckingham Palace spokesperson said.