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July 03, 2018 11:00 AM

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall proved once again that they are the royal couple that has the most fun on royal tours as they continued their visit to Wales on Tuesday.

The day kicked off with a bit of a cake catastrophe when a bid to create the world’s biggest Welsh cake suffered a setback when some of the confection tumbled from its cooker.

The scone-like cake was being baked on a specially-made contraption in the village square at Llangwm, West Wales, ahead of Charles and Camilla’s visit to the riverside village when chef Owen Hall and his team turned it and some of the 77-pound creation fell to the ground.

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall
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Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall
Tim Rooke/REX/Shutterstock

“We lost a lot of it earlier,” Hall, 40, explained to Prince Charles, 69, who was visiting the village with Camilla, 70, as part of their annual week in Wales. “Some of it fell out when we flipped it unfortunately.”

Hall said afterwards, “It hasn’t gone 100 percent according to plan — some of the edges fell out as we were spinning it. It’s a shame but we’ll make another attempt for sure.”

It didn’t dampen the festive atmosphere on the sun-drenched village about 250 miles west of London.

The couple were met by flag-waving school kids and parents as they arrived shortly for the first stop on the second day of their visit.

Prince Charles
Tim Rooke/REX/Shutterstock
Prince Charles
Tim Rooke/REX/Shutterstock

Meeting two budding 9-year-old journalists, Charles and Camilla — a supporter of literacy — asked what they were reading. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, one said to the duchess’s delight. “What about Harry Potter?” the prince asked.

“It’s wonderful isn’t it?” Charles said — before returning to the subject of journalism: “I look forward to seeing what happens when you’re older,” he quipped.

While outside, the village was decked out for the royals’ arrival — a group of scarecrows were even dressed as the Spice Girls. Inside the village hall, they were shown local crafts and listened to young harpist Harriet Devonald, 11, and chatted with artists and photographer David Wilson who were exhibiting their local artwork.

Tim Rooke/REX/Shutterstock

Later in the day, Camilla had a memorable carriage ride around the town. Growing up, the royal had a frisky pony she named Monkey.

Camilla, 70, was in her element at a equestrian haven on the edge of the remote Preseli mountains in West Wales when she was asked if she wanted to lead as a horse named Ed pulled a Polish cart for a short walk.

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall
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Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall
Getty

“She said that she’d had a pony when she was growing up called Monkey and that it was an apt name because he was naughty,” says Claire Bodsworth, 27, yard manager at the Dyfed Shire Horse farm near Newport, Pembrokeshire. “She said he was the best pony because he was a bit naughty.”

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall
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Bodsworth, who joined Camilla on the carriage, adds, “I offered her the reins and she said she’d be grateful to have a go. She was a lot better than me at controlling the carriage. She is a very good horsewoman and it’s great that she came here to help us raise awareness of this breed. They are rarer than pandas.”

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