The Duchess of Cambridge visited the V&A museum in London to see a unique collection of Fabergé eggs (some are on loan from the Queen!)
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The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to the 'Faberge in London: Romance to Revolution' exhibition
Kate Middleton steps out to the V&A on Thursday
| Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

Kate Middleton is getting a head start to the glittering holiday season with an outing that tapped into her artistic side.

The Duchess of Cambridge, who earned an art history degree at St. Andrew's University (where she met and fell in love with husband Prince William), visited the Victoria and Albert Museum in London on Thursday to view the Fabergé exhibition, which showcases more than 200 bejeweled objects created by Carl Fabergé.

Kate, 39, has a special connection to the exhibit as three of the famous decorative eggs on display were donated by her grandmother-in-law Queen Elizabeth.

The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to the 'Faberge in London: Romance to Revolution' exhibition
Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

As she viewed the exhibit, entitled Fabergé in London: Romance to Revolution, Kate heard about Fabergé's work and the fact that his only branch outside of Russia opened in London in 1903.

The exhibition features the largest display of Fabergé's legendary Imperial Easter Eggs in a generation, several of which are being shown in the U.K. for the first time. Included in the display are the Third Imperial Egg, which was discovered by a scrap dealer in 2011 (after it went missing almost 50 years earlier in 1964) and the largest, the Moscow Kremlin Egg, which was inspired by the architecture of the Dormition Cathedral in Moscow and features a music box that plays Tsar Nicholas II's favorite hymn. Also on show is the Alexander Palace Egg, which contains a model of the palace inside.

The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to the 'Faberge in London: Romance to Revolution' exhibition
Credit: Alamy Stock Photo

The three eggs loaned to the museum by the Queen are the Colonnade Egg, Basket of Flowers Egg and the Mosaic Egg.

The V&A (Victoria and Albert Museum) was established in 1852 to make works of art available to all and to inspire British designers and manufacturers. The Duchess of Cambridge became the first royal patron of the museum in 2018.

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The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to the 'Faberge in London: Romance to Revolution' exhibition
Kate Middleton at the V&A
| Credit: Jeremy Selwyn/AP/Shutterstock

Today, the V&A's collections, which span over 5000 years of human creativity in virtually every medium and from many parts of the world, continue to intrigue, inspire and inform.

Next week, Kate is set to host a spectacular Christmas carol concert at Westminster Abbey that will highlight the heroes of the COVID-19 pandemic and celebrate how communities have come together.