The temporary change is an annual tradition among the royal family
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remembrance day
Queen Elizabeth and Kate Middleton
| Credit: Chris Jackson/Getty

The royal family is marking a solemn occasion by giving their social media profiles a temporary update.

Keeping with tradition, the royals changed their profile pictures on social media to reflect the upcoming Remembrance Day, commemorating all who have lost their lives in war.

Kate Middleton and Prince William replaced a candid shot of the pair giggling during their 2020 visit to Ireland on their Instagram and Twitter pages (although their YouTube channel still features the smiling snap). In its place is a closeup of a poppy, the red flower which has been used since 1921 to commemorate military members who have died in war, with the number 100 to mark its milestone anniversary.

Last year, the couple opted for a photo that showed Kate and William, both 39, laying a wreath of poppies during their 2016 visit to Manchester.

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Instagram
Credit: Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Instagram

The RoyalFamily accounts on Instagram and Twitter, which gives updates on Queen Elizabeth and other members of family, changed their profile photos from a photo of the Queen smiling to show the monarch dressed in black with a red poppy pin at Westminster Abbey's Field of Remembrance in November 2004.

It's the same photo that the pages used last year for the month of November.

The Royal Family Instagram
Credit: The Royal Family Instagram

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall also updated their profile photos on their joint Clarence House pages to a group shot that they previously posted on October 28. The portrait shows the couple seated among 10 volunteer Poppy Appeal collectors representing each of the 10 decades of the Royal British Legion.

"The simple act of wearing a poppy is only made possible because of volunteer Poppy Appeal collectors who share a common goal — to recognise the unique contribution of the Armed Forces community," Prince Charles, 72, wrote in a rare personal caption. "Last year, for the first time in its history, the R.B.L. had to withdraw its collectors from the streets, owing to the pandemic. This year, we warmly welcome the return of Poppy Appeal collectors to our communities."

He continued, "My wife and I are immensely proud to launch the Poppy Appeal in this seminal year and we invite the nation to come together and, once again, wear a poppy in support of our Armed Forces community. After all, every poppy counts."

The last time the official accounts of the royal family members changed their profile pictures was in April following the death of Prince Philip. Kate and Prince William replaced a family photo with their joint monogram and changed their cover photo on Twitter to a black-and-white photo of the Duke of Edinburgh. Prince Charles and Camilla, 74, replaced a smiling shot of the couple, which was released to mark Wales Week 2019, with the Prince of Wales's feathers.

Meanwhile, the RoyalFamily accounts changed their profile photos to the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom.

All three accounts have shared the same announcement of Prince Philip's death alongside a portrait of the royal wearing his military uniform in black and white.

Queen Elizabeth II attends the annual Remembrance Sunday service at The Cenotaph
Queen Elizabeth
| Credit: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

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The royal family will mark Remembrance Day with a number of events this week, leading up to Remembrance Sunday on November 14. Queen Elizabeth, 95, has canceled several engagements after being hospitalized on October 20 and been told to rest by doctors. However, the palace previously announced that she plans to attend Sunday's service.

"It remains The Queen's firm intention to be present for the National Service of Remembrance on Remembrance Sunday, on 14th November," the palace said.