Kate Middleton was sent home with four cuddly toys — a squirrel, fox, owl and rabbit for George, Charlotte, Louis and baby Archie

By Erin Hill and Simon Perry
May 14, 2019 04:33 PM
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Kate Middleton has her hands full at home in Kensington Palace!

While the royal mom of three is certainly busy with “live wires” Prince George, 5, and Princess Charlotte, 4, it’s little Prince Louis who is keeping Kate on high alert.

During an outing to a War II code-breaking center in London on Tuesday, where her grandmother once worked, Kate revealed that Louis, who turned 1 last month, “is keeping us on our toes.”

“I turned around the other day and he was at the top of the slide — I had no idea!” she said, suggesting that Louis is already walking.

Kate has been sharing sweet details about her son throughout the year, revealing in January that he is “a fast crawler.” And in March, she shared: “Louis just wants to pull himself up all the time. He has got these little walkers and is bombing around in them.”

Prince Loui
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The royal was sent home from her visit with four cuddly toys, given to her by the school kids who were on hand to learn more about codebreaking — a squirrel, fox, owl and rabbit for George, Charlotte, Louis and baby Archie.

Kate MIddleton
Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty
Tim Rooke/REX/Shutterstock

“They love wild animals,” Kate, who visited Archie for the first time on Tuesday, told the kids. “They will look after these.”

PA Images/Sipa

During her visit, Kate also met with four women who had worked as codebreakers during WWII. She told them they must be “so proud” of their “very important work,” and shared her hopes that a new generation would celebrate them.

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Kate was then shown a new memorial of bricks that included the names of her grandmother and great-aunt. She said her grandma – like so many others – had been “so sworn to secrecy that she never felt able to tell us” about her work during the war.