The video is being seen by some as a breach in protocol, as discussions between the prime minister and the Queen are supposed to remain private

By Stephanie Petit
November 06, 2019 10:42 AM

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson just shared a glimpse into his weekly audience with Queen Elizabeth.

On Wednesday, the Conservative leader spoke candidly in a video posted to his Twitter account — filmed from the backseat of his car as he’s headed to Buckingham Palace.

“I’m just off to see Her Majesty the Queen, which is always a very tough interview because she always asks the best questions,” he said. “And the question today is: ‘Why are we having this election?’ “

The U.K. has a general election on Dec. 12, where the British public will have to decide, as Johnson put it on Twitter, if they “want to #GetBrexitDone or have two more referendums next year with [Labour party leader Jeremy] Corbyn?”

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The video is being seen by some as a breach in protocol, as discussions between the prime minister and the Queen are supposed to remain private because the monarch is supposed to “remain strictly neutral with respect to political matters.”

“By convention, The Queen does not vote or stand for election, however Her Majesty does have important ceremonial and formal roles in relation to the government of the UK,” according to the royal family’s website.

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Queen Elizabeth

With Boris Johnson’s comfortable victory over Jeremy Hunt to become the new Conservative leader this summer, he became the 14th prime minister during the 93-year-old monarch’s reign. Queen Elizabeth even delayed her planned vacation to Balmoral Castle in Scotland so that she could meet the new prime minister.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Queen Elizabeth
Victoria Jones - WPA Pool/Getty

In August, Queen Elizabeth approved Johnson’s request to suspend Parliament from early September to October 14 — just before the Brexit deadline.

In taking the controversial step of advising the Queen to call a halt to Parliament, Johnson has shortened the amount of time lawmakers have to oppose his no-deal Brexit plans to leave the European Union.

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Halting Parliament is known as “proroguing.” It is a power that rests with the Queen, and is carried out on the advice of the prime minister, the BBC explains. But, in doing so, it reduces the influence of Members of Parliament (MPs).

Johnson proposed that Parliament be suspended from early September until October 14, when it would return to hear the Queen’s speech of new legislation and signal a new Parliamentary sitting. Johnson wrote that he wanted the Queen’s speech “to bring forward a new bold and ambitious domestic legislative agenda for the renewal of our country after Brexit.”

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