Joe Biden, meanwhile, said in his DNC speech Thursday that he promises to "draw on the best of us, not the worst"

By Benjamin VanHoose
August 21, 2020 09:16 AM
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President Donald Trump
Doug Mills - Pool/Getty

President Donald Trump didn't miss an opportunity to respond to the various political figures and celebrities who denounced him at the 2020 Democratic National Convention this week.

On Thursday, the political event concluded as Joe Biden formally accepted the party's nomination, wrapping up four days of speeches, video messages, live performances and more programming meant to rally Democrats and urge voters to vote against Trump at the polls on Nov. 3.

The opening night of the DNC saw a powerful speech by former first lady Michelle Obama, 56, during which she said in no uncertain terms: “Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country."

Trump, 74, fired back on Twitter the following morning, quipping, "Thanks for your very kind words Michelle!" and claiming that "your husband" former President Barack Obama is the reason he was elected in 2016. "Somebody please explain to @MichelleObama that Donald J. Trump would not be here, in the beautiful White House, if it weren’t for the job done by your husband, Barack Obama," he tweeted.

Republican and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich also spoke during the virtual DNC, condemning Trump as the wrong man for the job. Trump, of course, didn't let the slamming go unchecked, tweeting that Kasich was "easy to beat" in 2016 and "went to the other side desperate for relevance."

As the DNC spotlighted the ongoing novel coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, Trump repeated his go-to claim, tweeting, "Tell the Dems that we have more Cases because we do FAR more Testing than any other Country!"

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Trump also referenced peaceful protests and demonstrations across the country that are in response to police brutality and racial injustice, stating that the protests, in his mind, means social distancing at the polls on election day is negated. "IF YOU CAN PROTEST IN PERSON, YOU CAN VOTE IN PERSON!" he wrote, continuing his attack on mail-in voting during the pandemic.

By the third night of the DNC, when his Oval Office predecessor Obama addressed viewers, Trump's tweeting habits became increasingly more capitalized. "Our democracy" is at stake, Obama, 59, said at the end of his live speech from the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, which DNC officials said was chosen as a backdrop in order to "underscore that democracy itself is on the line."

"Joe and Kamala [Harris, Biden's running mate] will restore our standing in the world," he added. "As we've learned from this pandemic, that matters. Joe knows the world and the world knows him. They actually care about every American."

"HE SPIED ON MY CAMPAIGN, AND GOT CAUGHT!" Trump claimed, responding to Obama's speech. In another tweet, he wrote, "WHY DID HE REFUSE TO ENDORSE SLOW JOE UNTIL IT WAS ALL OVER, AND EVEN THEN WAS VERY LATE? WHY DID HE TRY TO GET HIM NOT TO RUN?"

Between his sporadic clap backs at the DNC speakers, the President tweeted several of his taglines (in all-caps), including "MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN" and "THANK YOU! #MAGA."

RELATED VIDEO: Donald Trump Reacts to Michelle Obama's Speech Denouncing Him: 'Your Husband' Is Reason I Got Elected

Finally, when Biden spoke and accepted the nomination, officially becoming the presidential candidate to take on Trump, the president lodged attacks against his opponent via Twitter.

"In 47 years, Joe did none of the things of which he now speaks. He will never change, just words!" Trump tweeted.

In his speech, on the other hand, Biden (without directly naming Trump throughout) said that he vows to "draw on the best of us, not the worst."

Setting the table for the final stretch of the campaign, Biden stressed the importance of the upcoming "life-changing" election. "This will determine what America is going to look like for a long, long time," he said.

The Republican National Convention begins Monday.