All four of the president's adult children will speak this week

By Sean Neumann and Adam Carlson
August 25, 2020 10:11 PM
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Tiffany Trump speaking Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention.
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Tiffany Trump, the least openly political of her adult siblings, made a rare appearance in support of her father on Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention — urging "judgment based on results, not rhetoric."

Tiffany, 26, is the second-youngest of Donald Trump's children, four of whom are speaking this week with the hope of rallying the president's base ahead of the November election between him and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

Tiffany's oldest brother, Donald Trump Jr., spoke on Monday at the RNC. And while much of his remarks attacked Biden in contrast to their dad, Tiffany spoke in broader terms about transcending "political boundaries" and seeking truth (language that also echoed the sensibilities of her mom, Marla Maples).

"Working together outside of our political comfort zones will accomplish so much more," she said. "Some cynical politicians do not seem to believe in the miracle of America. Well, I do."

"Having hope is not weakness," she said, "and believing in miracles is a gift from God."

Tiffany's speech included familiar plaudits for President Trump's record — particularly on criminal justice reform, a rare bipartisan achievement; and on spotlighting drug costs — and she voiced her support for some of his key themes, like what she and the GOP call an oppressive "cancel culture."

She said, "A vote for my father ... is a vote to uphold our American ideals."

In some of her few pointed remarks, Tiffany took aim at "media" and "tech giants" that she said were controlling the information people see, keeping them "mentally enslaved to the ideas they deem correct."

It's been four years since Tiffany's previous RNC speech, which was then her most notable political appearance.

Unlike her older brothers and sister, she has not been heavily involved in the Trump campaign, administration or real estate business — rather, she just finished law school at Georgetown University.

Tiffany Trump (right) with boyfriend Michael Boulos in the White House
Tiffany Trump/Instagram
From left: Tiffany Trump and President Donald Trump
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

"Since speaking at the Republican National Convention four years ago so much has changed for the world, for the country and for my family," she said Tuesday.

"As as recent graduate I can relate to so many of you who might be looking for a job" in the novel coronavirus pandemic, she said.

But Tiffany — who was largely raised on the West Coast by her mom after Maples and Trump divorced in the '90s — has not always been close with the president.

“Since the inauguration, Tiffany and her father have sometimes gone for months without speaking and she went a very long time without seeing him,” a source close to her told PEOPLE in April 2018. “The last time she was at a family function with him, it was awkward for her and she didn’t feel totally welcome.”

Her relationship with the president was pulled into the spotlight last year when former White House aide Madeline Westerhout told reporters intimate details about the family dynamic.

Westerhout, who has said she had too much to drink, said during an off-the-record dinner that she had a stronger relationship with the president than his daughters, Tiffany and Ivanka Trump, and said that President Trump did not like being in pictures with Tiffany because he thought his youngest daughter was “overweight."

President Trump later tweeted that he spoke with Westerhout and "fully understood and forgave her" for the comments, which he said were untrue.

"I love Tiffany, doing great!" the president wrote in the same tweet.

When Tiffany graduated from Georgetown earlier this year, Trump tweeted: "Congratulations to my daughter, Tiffany, on graduating from Georgetown Law. Great student, great school. Just what I need is a lawyer in the family. Proud of you Tiff!"