The daytime talk show host praised Hannity for speaking out against the protesters

By Claudia Harmata
May 05, 2020 04:19 PM
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From left: Joy Behar and Sean Hannity
Mike Pont/WireImage; Bennett Raglin/WireImage

It seems Joy Behar can agree with Sean Hannity on one thing, at least.

On Tuesday, The View co-host commended the Fox News host and conservative commentator for speaking against the anti-lockdown protesters.

"Things are really bad when even Sean Hannity is out there telling these crazy people to stop it. Just stop it," Behar said on Tuesday's show, following Hannity's comments on his Monday night broadcast.

"I come from the generation, as do you Whoopi, where we protested the Vietnam War. ... Nobody was carrying a gun, okay," Behar, 77, continued. "That is not a protest. That is a terrorist act, or the indication of it. I don’t say that they are terrorists, but they are certainly intimidators."

She added, "They are trying to intimidate people with this. And radio silence on the right by the way, besides Sean Hannity, I haven’t heard anybody else say something like that.”

Behar's comments were in response to Hannity's remarks on his eponymous show, during which he called out the armed protesters in Michigan for, in his words, "attempting to intimidate officials with the show of force."

"Now, no one is a bigger defender of the Second Amendment than yours truly," the Fox host, 58, said. "Everyone has a right to protest, protect themselves, and try to get the country open."

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"This with the militia look here and these long guns, uh no," he continued, as his show aired footage of protesters gathering with large guns.

"Show of force is dangerous," Hannity said. "That puts our police at risk and, by the way, your message will never be heard, whoever you people are. No one should be attempting to intimidate officials with the show of force. And God forbid something that happens, then they're going to go after all of us law abiding Second Amendment people.”

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Around the country, groups of protesters have become more and more vocal as they've tried to push their local leaders to reopen states despite health officials warning that it may be too soon to lift restrictions aimed at slowing the virus' spread.

In Michigan, which has had some of the strictest restrictions in the U.S., hundreds of protesters gathered inside the state capitol on Thursday as lawmakers debated Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's request to extend her emergency powers to combat the virus.

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In footage shared by local journalists, the crowd could be heard chanting “Let us in! Let us in!” as they stood shoulder-to-shoulder. (They were not allowed onto the floor where lawmakers were.)

Michigan state Sen. Dayna Polehanki shared a photo from the protest, and her office told PEOPLE at least one of her colleagues came to work in bulletproof vests.

"Directly above me, men with rifles yelling at us," she tweeted. "Some of my colleagues who own bullet proof vests are wearing them. I have never appreciated our Sergeants-at-Arms more than today."

Police on the scene, however, said the Michigan protest was not as heated as it may have appeared. Carrying guns at the Capitol is legal in Michigan, though that policy is now under review.

“There’s always a risk, but we were prepared for it. People are allowed to exercise their right to freedom of speech and their right to open carry. We always kept an eye on it," Michigan State Police Lt. Brian Oleksyk told the Detroit Free Press.

After protestors were done "venting their frustrations in a loud manner," Oleksyk said, "people were pleasant and polite.”

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