Many on Twitter rejoiced on Friday as news broke that President Donald Trump's chief strategist, Steve Bannon, was out at the White House

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Many on Twitter rejoiced on Friday as multiple news outlets reported that Donald Trump‘s chief strategist, Steve Bannon, was out of the White House in the wake of the president’s disastrous response to the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement: “White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Steve Bannon have mutually agreed today would be Steve’s last day. We are grateful for his service and wish him the best.”

ABC News reported that Bannon, the former executive chairman of Breitbart News, had resigned from his role as White House chief strategist, while The New York Times said a person close to Bannon “insisted the parting of ways was his idea, and that he had submitted his resignation to the president on Aug. 7, to be announced at the start of this week, but it was delayed in the wake of the racial unrest in Charlottesville, Virginia.”

After Charlottesville, Trump had faced mounting pressure to fire Bannon because of his ties to the white nationalist movement. The hashtag #FireBannon was trending on Twitter for much of last Sunday night and into the early days of this week.

On Friday, the when and why of Bannon’s exit didn’t seem to matter so much to critics on Twitter, where the hashtag #BannonOut was trending.

Actress and vocal Trump critic Rosie O’Donnell was among the first to react, firing off a tweet referencing the tiki torches wielded by white supremacist groups at their rally in Charlottesville.

Other stars, politicians and commentators followed suit.

Amid the celebratory tweets, however, some critics warned that Bannon’s departure doesn’t solve the larger problem of Trump’s presidency.

“Firing of Steve Bannon is more than rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic. It’s like firing the first officer. But problem is still @POTUS,” tweeted California Rep. Ted Lieu, who’s quickly becoming one of Trump’s key Twitter antagonists.

DNC National Press Secretary Michael Tyler said in a statement: “There is one less white supremacist in the White House, but that doesn’t change the man sitting behind the Resolute desk. Donald Trump has spent decades fueling hate in communities, including his recent attempts to divide our country and give a voice to white supremacists.”

And former strategist for President George W. Bush Matthew Dowd reminded those celebrating that the news was hardly likely to improve the president’s behavior. “Trump is Trump,” Dowd tweeted.