Trump, however, continues to enjoy widespread support with the GOP base and often touts his popularity there

By Nicholas Rice
September 03, 2020 12:53 PM
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Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder
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Rick Snyder is still not supporting Donald Trump.

On Thursday, the former governor of Michigan, 62, wrote a Detroit Free Press op-ed announcing that he is voting for Joe Biden over the president in the Nov. 3 election.

Snyder — who is Michigan's most recent Republican governor, leaving office in 2019 — wrote that he "will continue to support and stand up for Republican policies and values, and support Republican candidates" but "will not support Donald Trump for reelection."

He similarly withheld his support in 2016.

In contrast to Trump, 74, who is a "a bully who lacks a moral compass," Snyder wrote Thursday that Biden "would bring back civility" in his post.

"I was at the nation’s Capitol when Trump gave his inaugural address," Snyder wrote. "I had hoped this first speech as president would be a message to unify a divided nation. Instead, I heard a speech directed at how he would help the people who supported him. And sadly, that is how President Trump continues to govern."

Snyder is among a vocal minority of noted Republicans who are not backing Trump, including former presidential candidate and Ohio Gov. John Kasich and former Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake.

Trump, however, continues to enjoy widespread support with the GOP base and often touts his popularity there.

Responding to Kasich appearing at the Democratic National Convention last month, Trump tweeted: "John Kasich did a bad job in Ohio, ran for President and was easy to beat, and now went to the other side desperate for relevance."

Rick Snyder
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In his Thursday column, Snyder wrote of the division caused by Trump's temperament.

"President Trump’s answer to people who oppose or disagree with them is to be verbally abusive. In other words, he is a bully," he wrote.

He then wrote that a significant leader "treats people with respect even when they present different opinions" before he added, "Being a bully and being strong are not the same thing. Being strong is standing up for your convictions. Being a bully is trying to intimidate those who are perceived to be weaker or a threat."

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The president, Snyder wrote, "lacks a moral compass" and "ignores the truth."

"Facts and science matter," he wrote. "Good decisions should be based on facts and supported by sound scientific theory whenever possible."

But Biden was different, in his view.

On supporting Biden, Snyder wrote that he has interacted with the Democratic nominee when Biden served as vice president under Barack Obama.

"My interactions were always constructive and respectful," Snyder wrote. "He has shown the desire to heal a deeply divided nation; has demonstrated strong moral character and empathy; and he seems willing to listen to people who have different perspectives from his own."

President Donald Trump (left) and former Vice President Joe Biden
Leon Neal/Getty Images; MediaPunch/Shutterstock

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Synder finished by noting that, despite his Biden endorsement, he remains "a Republican who also will be publicly supporting Republican candidates at the local, state and federal level."

Last month, an array of former Republican members of Congress endorsed Biden for president, ahead of the first night of the Republican National Convention.

"These former Members of Congress are supporting Joe Biden because they know what’s at stake in this election and that Trump’s failures as President have superseded partisanship," a statement from Biden's campaign said.

Elsewhere, former GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina said that she is voting for Biden over Trump in November, as was as former Trump aide Anthony Scaramucci, who said he is voting Democrat and would support Biden.

"I’ve been very clear that I can’t support Donald Trump," Fiorina, 65, said this summer. "And, you know, elections are binary choices … I will say this: I think — I hope — that Biden understands that this moment in history calls for him to be a leader, not a politician."

During an interview earlier this year with CNN’s Richard Quest on Markets Now, Scaramucci said, "I’m a Republican for Joe Biden because the president is not a Republican. I’m not a Trumpist. I’m an old-school Republican like Mitt Romney, old-school Republican like George Herbert Walker Bush."