Graffiti was scrawled on both homes

Advertisement
Mitch McConnell, Nancy Pelosi
Mitch McConnell (left) and Nancy Pelosi
| Credit: Sarah Silbiger-Pool/Getty; Stefani Reynolds/Getty

Less than a week after the Republican-controlled Senate failed to take up a measure increasing American COVID-19 relief payments to $2,000, the homes of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi were vandalized with graffiti messages.

Photos taken of McConnell’s Kentucky home on Saturday showed an expletive written on the Republican's mailbox. “WERES MY MONEY” could be seen written below a wreath on the front door and “MITCH KILLS THE POOR” was scrawled over a window.

Pelosi's San Francisco home was defaced with graffiti, as well, including “$2K,” “CANCEL RENT!” and “WE WANT EVERYTHING" written on the Democrat's garage door.

According to the Associated Press, citing a police statement, a severed pig's head and fake blood were also left at Pelosi's home on New Year's Day.

Pelosi was reportedly not at home when the incident took place. It's unclear whether McConnell was home when his own home was vandalized, and his office did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's inquiry on if he was home.

Graffiti reading, "Where's my money" is seen on a door of the home of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky
Graffiti reading, "Where's my money" is seen on a door of the home of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
| Credit: Timothy D Easley/AP/Shutterstock

On Saturday, McConnell released a statement condemning the vandalism, which he said was the result of a "radical tantrum."

“I’ve spent my career fighting for the First Amendment and defending peaceful protest,” McConnell's statement read. “I appreciate every Kentuckian who has engaged in the democratic process whether they agree with me or not. This is different. Vandalism and the politics of fear have no place in our society.”

"My wife and I have never been intimidated by this toxic playbook," he continued. "We just hope our neighbors in Louisville aren't too inconvenienced by this radical tantrum."

The vandalism came in the wake of the passage of a $2.3 trillion government funding deal and COVID-19 relief bill, which was signed into law last week.

The passage of the bipartisan bill came after months of gridlock and included $600 relief payments for Americans making less than $75,000.

Though President Donald Trump was expected to sign the bill shortly after it arrived on his desk, he instead stalled, suggesting he would veto the bill if it was not revised to include $2,000 checks (for which Democrats had initially pressed).

"I'm asking Congress to amend this bill and increase the ridiculously low $600 to $2,000 or $4,000 for a couple," Trump said in a four-minute video in which he called the bill a "disgrace." 

Trump also sought to have remove numerous spending measures he disliked removed from the bill.

In response, Democrats (in an effort spearheaded by Pelosi) attempted amend the bill to include $2,000 payments, saying they had been in favor of larger checks all along.

But those attempts failed after a vote on a standalone measure to increase payments to $2,000 for individuals was blocked by McConnell. That standalone measure had been supported by nearly all House Democrats and a few dozen House Republicans.

Trump eventually signed the COVID-19 relief bill and government funding package, but still slammed McConnell for holding up the increased payments.

"Unless Republicans have a death wish, and it is also the right thing to do, they must approve the $2000 payments ASAP," Trump tweeted after McConnell blocked Democrats' attempts to approve the larger checks.

Trump's "death wish" comments seemingly reference a pair of Georgia Senate run-offs set for Tuesday. The results of those races will ultimately determine which party has control of the Senate.

Both Republicans in the Senate races have recently come out in favor of larger, $2,000 checks, flip-flopping on earlier comments they had made after the president threw his support behind the payments.