As word came Wednesday that NBC News had fired Today show anchor Matt Lauer, citing “inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace," many wondered when 2017's sexual-misconduct reckoning would claim another alleged predator: President Donald Trump. Mira Sorvino believes the time is nigh

By Tierney McAfee
November 29, 2017 02:13 PM
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As word came Wednesday that NBC News had fired Today show anchor Matt Lauer, citing “inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace,” many wondered when 2017’s sexual-misconduct reckoning would claim another alleged predator: President Donald Trump.

Mira Sorvino believes the time is nigh.

“You’re going down, @realDonaldTrump,” the actress wrote on Twitter Wednesday, in response to a tweet from another user who called out the president by quipping: “I know one former NBC star who needs to be investigated for sexual assault. He was on this show called The Apprentice….”

Sorvino, 50, continued, “You already admitted in 2016 that the tape was real-you’ve admitted to #sexualassault & you have almost 20 women w/claims to back you up. Time to start packing-you are not immune & the cultural tide against sexual predators will sweep you away.”

Responding to another tweet noting that Trump has — so far — seemed immune to the sexual misconduct allegations against him (all of which he has denied), Sorvino declared: “No one is immune. Nixon proved that.”

Last month, Sorvino joined the dozens of women who have accused Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and assault. The actress shared her story in a New Yorker exposé about Weinstein, alleging that he sexually harassed her at the Toronto International Film Festival in 1995. Weinstein, through his lawyer, has denied all “allegations of non-consensual sex” against him.

Sorvino explained her decision to come forward in a piece for TIME last month, writing, “I have lived in vague fear of Harvey Weinstein for over 20 years. At the time I don’t think I even knew what happened — him using business-related situations to try and press himself sexually on a young woman in his employ — qualified as sexual harassment. But as a woman who routinely advocates for women and girls who have been victimized in my role as Goodwill Ambassador with the United Nations, and as a mother, I could no longer remain silent.”

Credit: David Livingston/Getty; JORGE SILVA/AFP/Getty

Sorvino isn’t the only one eagerly awaiting the president’s potential judgement day.

During this last year, as the recent accusations of sexual misconduct against a long list of powerful men in Hollywood and other industries have been widely believed — and led to resignations, loss of careers and other fallout — some of the more than a dozen women who have accused Trump of sexual harassment or assault are wondering when the president might finally pay a price for what he allegedly did to them.

For them, Trump’s tweet earlier on Wednesday celebrating Lauer’s firing rang hypocritical — to say the least.

PEOPLE writer Natasha Stoynoff — who has accused Trump of attacking her in 2005 by pushing her up against a wall at Mar-a- Lago and shoving his tongue down her throat — tells PEOPLE in an email: “It doesn’t surprise me at all that Mr. Trump would criticize someone else’s inappropriate sexual behavior and not address his own.”

“From what I understand, people who are delusional and narcissistic lack self-awareness and have a need to lash out,” she added.

Added another Trump accuser, Melinda McGillivray: “Donald is a complete hypocrite; he has the audacity to talk smack about other people when he’s the culprit himself.”