Meanwhile, top Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway said Thursday that she was confident the president would serve two full terms

By Tierney McAfee
February 23, 2017 04:36 PM
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty

Democratic Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison floated the idea of impeaching President Trump during a CNN debate on Wednesday between contenders for the Democratic National Committee chair position.

Debate co-host Dana Bash asked Ellison, a frontrunner to be the next chair of the DNC, whether he agreed with three of his colleagues in the House — Maxine Waters, Jamie Raskin, and Joaquin Castro — who “have publicly raised the specter of impeaching President Trump.”

“Do you stand with them or with House Leader Nancy Pelosi who believes impeachment talk is premature?” she asked.

Ellison replied that the president “has already done a number of things which legitimately raise the question of impeachment,” holding up as example what he called “Trump’s violation of the Emoluments Clause.”

“I mean, on day one he was – on day one he was in violation of the Emoluments Clause,” Ellison said. “This is a part of the Constitution that says as the president you can’t get payments from a foreign power. The day people checked into his hotel and started paying him, who were foreign dignitaries, he was in violation of that law.”

Just days after the president was inaugurated on Jan. 20, the nonprofit legal watchdog group CREW filed a lawsuit alleging that Trump’s business dealings violate the constitutional provision prohibiting officeholders from accepting “emoluments or presents” from foreign governments.

Ellison called for impeachment investigations, “not to go after Donald Trump but to protect our Constitution and the presidency of the United States so that nobody can monetize the presidency and profit off of it for their own gain.”

RELATED VIDEO: Watch: Natasha Stoynoff Breaks Silence, Accuses Donald Trump of Sexual Attack

Meanwhile, top Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway said Thursday that she was confident the president would serve two full terms.

“We’re playing long ball here,” Conway said in a Fox and Friends interview. “He will be here for eight years. We recognize that there will be people who will be trying to throw crocodiles in our way.”

“This country, for 24 consecutive years, gave its presidents two terms,” she added. “This country decided that with presidents Clinton, George W. Bush, and Obama that four years is not enough for them to execute and deliver on their vision.”

Advertisement



EDIT POST