This is the fourth Democratic primary held so far ahead of November's election

By Benjamin VanHoose
February 29, 2020 07:50 PM
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South Carolina has spoken.

On Saturday, the state’s 2020 Democratic presidential primary had voters make their pick among the leading candidates for the party’s nomination heading into November’s election against President Donald Trump.

Not long after voting closed, former Vice President Joe Biden was declared the winner by multiple news outlets, with early data showing a significant victory.

It was his first of the season, reviving his campaign as he has insisted all along it would.

“Thank you, South Carolina!” Biden, 77, tweeted. “To all those who have been knocked down, counted out, and left behind — this is your campaign. Together, we will win this nomination and beat Donald Trump.”

The primary results were still being counted but the initial returns, exit polls and other data suggested a Biden victory in the double digits over the other candidates, such as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is the Democratic front-runner with two primary wins so far.

South Carolina was the fourth primary held. Past winners include former South Bend, Indiana, mayor Pete Buttigieg in Iowa and Sanders in New Hampshire and Nevada.

The state saw the first use of a new voting machine as well, according to Politico. The updated equipment was implemented to better prevent hacking.

Former Vice President Joe Biden
Scott Olson/Getty Images

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From left: Mike Bloomberg, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar on Feb. 19.
Mario Tama/Getty

Biden went into the South Carolina primary hoping to revitalize his campaign with a much-needed push in voter support.

He confidently stated at the debate on Tuesday that he’d win given his substantial support from the African-American community, who make up more than half of the state’s voters.

Earlier this month, his campaign cast his losses in Iowa and New Hampshire — where he finished fourth and fifth — as not representative of the Democratic Party. Aides said states like South Carolina, which is larger and more diverse, would reflect his base.

The candidates will next turn to “Super Tuesday” only three days away, when 14 states will vote at once and more than 1,300 of the needed 1,991 delegates are up for grabs.